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The Star Wars Scroll Illusion

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ABSTRACT

The Star Wars Scroll Illusion is a dynamic version of the Leaning Tower Illusion. When two copies of a Star-Wars-like scrolling text are placed side by side (with separate vanishing points), the two scrolls appear to head in different directions even though they are physically parallel in the picture plane. Variations of the illusion are shown with one vanishing point, as well as from an inverted perspective where the scrolls appear to originate in the distance. The demos highlight the conflict between the physical lines in the picture plane and perspective interpretation: With two perspective points, the scrolling texts are parallel to each other in the picture plane but not in perspective interpretation; with one perspective point, the texts are not parallel to each other in the picture plane but are parallel to each other in perspective interpretation. The size of the effect is linearly related to the angle of rotation of the scrolls into the third dimension; the Scroll Illusion is stronger than the Leaning Tower Illusion for rotation angles between 35° and 90°. There is no effect of motion per se on the strength of the illusion.

No MeSH data available.


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(see Movie 3). The effects of rotating the text in depth along the x-axis. (a) to (d) Still images of the scrolling text at 0°, −30°, −60°, and −90°. (e) Observers were asked to set the angle of yellow lines to match the directions that they perceived the text scrolls to move. (f) Magnitude of the effect (angle of right line − angle of left line) as a function of the angle of rotation along the x-axis. The filled circles indicate the average of all seven observers; the solid line is the best fit to the average. The individual symbols and dashed lines indicate the results from the seven observers. The red line indicates the average magnitude of the settings (and the corresponding angle of rotation) for the classic Leaning Tower Illusion.
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fig4-2041669515604060: (see Movie 3). The effects of rotating the text in depth along the x-axis. (a) to (d) Still images of the scrolling text at 0°, −30°, −60°, and −90°. (e) Observers were asked to set the angle of yellow lines to match the directions that they perceived the text scrolls to move. (f) Magnitude of the effect (angle of right line − angle of left line) as a function of the angle of rotation along the x-axis. The filled circles indicate the average of all seven observers; the solid line is the best fit to the average. The individual symbols and dashed lines indicate the results from the seven observers. The red line indicates the average magnitude of the settings (and the corresponding angle of rotation) for the classic Leaning Tower Illusion.

Mentions: As shown in Movie 3, the strength of the illusion is determined primarily by the rotation of the scrolling texts into the third dimension. Figure 4 shows the text rotated in perspective along the x-axis at 0, −30°, −60°, and −90° (the axis of rotation is not at the base of the scrolling text; hence, the rotation is similar to a slightly elevated camera angle, and 90° is not exactly perpendicular to the observer). The scrolling texts are identical but translated laterally from each other. At 0°, the texts appear to scroll in parallel in the picture plane. With each successive rotation, the apparent direction of the left scroll deviates further from the right scroll.Figure 4.


The Star Wars Scroll Illusion
(see Movie 3). The effects of rotating the text in depth along the x-axis. (a) to (d) Still images of the scrolling text at 0°, −30°, −60°, and −90°. (e) Observers were asked to set the angle of yellow lines to match the directions that they perceived the text scrolls to move. (f) Magnitude of the effect (angle of right line − angle of left line) as a function of the angle of rotation along the x-axis. The filled circles indicate the average of all seven observers; the solid line is the best fit to the average. The individual symbols and dashed lines indicate the results from the seven observers. The red line indicates the average magnitude of the settings (and the corresponding angle of rotation) for the classic Leaning Tower Illusion.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016821&req=5

fig4-2041669515604060: (see Movie 3). The effects of rotating the text in depth along the x-axis. (a) to (d) Still images of the scrolling text at 0°, −30°, −60°, and −90°. (e) Observers were asked to set the angle of yellow lines to match the directions that they perceived the text scrolls to move. (f) Magnitude of the effect (angle of right line − angle of left line) as a function of the angle of rotation along the x-axis. The filled circles indicate the average of all seven observers; the solid line is the best fit to the average. The individual symbols and dashed lines indicate the results from the seven observers. The red line indicates the average magnitude of the settings (and the corresponding angle of rotation) for the classic Leaning Tower Illusion.
Mentions: As shown in Movie 3, the strength of the illusion is determined primarily by the rotation of the scrolling texts into the third dimension. Figure 4 shows the text rotated in perspective along the x-axis at 0, −30°, −60°, and −90° (the axis of rotation is not at the base of the scrolling text; hence, the rotation is similar to a slightly elevated camera angle, and 90° is not exactly perpendicular to the observer). The scrolling texts are identical but translated laterally from each other. At 0°, the texts appear to scroll in parallel in the picture plane. With each successive rotation, the apparent direction of the left scroll deviates further from the right scroll.Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The Star Wars Scroll Illusion is a dynamic version of the Leaning Tower Illusion. When two copies of a Star-Wars-like scrolling text are placed side by side (with separate vanishing points), the two scrolls appear to head in different directions even though they are physically parallel in the picture plane. Variations of the illusion are shown with one vanishing point, as well as from an inverted perspective where the scrolls appear to originate in the distance. The demos highlight the conflict between the physical lines in the picture plane and perspective interpretation: With two perspective points, the scrolling texts are parallel to each other in the picture plane but not in perspective interpretation; with one perspective point, the texts are not parallel to each other in the picture plane but are parallel to each other in perspective interpretation. The size of the effect is linearly related to the angle of rotation of the scrolls into the third dimension; the Scroll Illusion is stronger than the Leaning Tower Illusion for rotation angles between 35° and 90°. There is no effect of motion per se on the strength of the illusion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus