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Sigmund Exner ’ s (1887) Einige Beobachtungen ü ber Bewegungsnachbilder (Some Observations on Movement Aftereffects): An Illustrated Translation With Commentary

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ABSTRACT

In his original contribution, Exner’s principal concern was a comparison between the properties of different aftereffects, and particularly to determine whether aftereffects of motion were similar to those of color and whether they could be encompassed within a unified physiological framework. Despite the fact that he was unable to answer his main question, there are some excellent—so far unknown—contributions in Exner’s paper. For example, he describes observations that can be related to binocular interaction, not only in motion aftereffects but also in rivalry. To the best of our knowledge, Exner provides the first description of binocular rivalry induced by differently moving patterns in each eye, for motion as well as for their aftereffects. Moreover, apart from several known, but beautifully addressed, phenomena he makes a clear distinction between motion in depth based on stimulus properties and motion in depth based on the interpretation of motion. That is, the experience of movement, as distinct from the perception of movement. The experience, unlike the perception, did not result in a motion aftereffect in depth.

No MeSH data available.


Representation of the experimental set-up for Experiment 6. Most of the wheel was covered as represented by the shaded area, where it should be noted that the extent of coverage cannot be ascertained from the text.
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fig5-2041669515593044: Representation of the experimental set-up for Experiment 6. Most of the wheel was covered as represented by the shaded area, where it should be noted that the extent of coverage cannot be ascertained from the text.

Mentions: We have tried to follow the original text as closely as possible. The goal, however, was to convey Exner’s ideas. We adjusted the text when necessary for understanding his ideas. Exner’s article did not contain any illustrations. We have added the illustrations for reasons of clarity. Truth be told, it was not always clear what the exact viewing conditions were (see e.g., Figures 5 and 6), but we think we captured the essence.


Sigmund Exner ’ s (1887) Einige Beobachtungen ü ber Bewegungsnachbilder (Some Observations on Movement Aftereffects): An Illustrated Translation With Commentary
Representation of the experimental set-up for Experiment 6. Most of the wheel was covered as represented by the shaded area, where it should be noted that the extent of coverage cannot be ascertained from the text.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016818&req=5

fig5-2041669515593044: Representation of the experimental set-up for Experiment 6. Most of the wheel was covered as represented by the shaded area, where it should be noted that the extent of coverage cannot be ascertained from the text.
Mentions: We have tried to follow the original text as closely as possible. The goal, however, was to convey Exner’s ideas. We adjusted the text when necessary for understanding his ideas. Exner’s article did not contain any illustrations. We have added the illustrations for reasons of clarity. Truth be told, it was not always clear what the exact viewing conditions were (see e.g., Figures 5 and 6), but we think we captured the essence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In his original contribution, Exner’s principal concern was a comparison between the properties of different aftereffects, and particularly to determine whether aftereffects of motion were similar to those of color and whether they could be encompassed within a unified physiological framework. Despite the fact that he was unable to answer his main question, there are some excellent—so far unknown—contributions in Exner’s paper. For example, he describes observations that can be related to binocular interaction, not only in motion aftereffects but also in rivalry. To the best of our knowledge, Exner provides the first description of binocular rivalry induced by differently moving patterns in each eye, for motion as well as for their aftereffects. Moreover, apart from several known, but beautifully addressed, phenomena he makes a clear distinction between motion in depth based on stimulus properties and motion in depth based on the interpretation of motion. That is, the experience of movement, as distinct from the perception of movement. The experience, unlike the perception, did not result in a motion aftereffect in depth.

No MeSH data available.