Limits...
Sigmund Exner ’ s (1887) Einige Beobachtungen ü ber Bewegungsnachbilder (Some Observations on Movement Aftereffects): An Illustrated Translation With Commentary

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In his original contribution, Exner’s principal concern was a comparison between the properties of different aftereffects, and particularly to determine whether aftereffects of motion were similar to those of color and whether they could be encompassed within a unified physiological framework. Despite the fact that he was unable to answer his main question, there are some excellent—so far unknown—contributions in Exner’s paper. For example, he describes observations that can be related to binocular interaction, not only in motion aftereffects but also in rivalry. To the best of our knowledge, Exner provides the first description of binocular rivalry induced by differently moving patterns in each eye, for motion as well as for their aftereffects. Moreover, apart from several known, but beautifully addressed, phenomena he makes a clear distinction between motion in depth based on stimulus properties and motion in depth based on the interpretation of motion. That is, the experience of movement, as distinct from the perception of movement. The experience, unlike the perception, did not result in a motion aftereffect in depth.

No MeSH data available.


(a) An illustration of the Ludwig-Baltzar (in the original paper Exner wrote Balzar) kymograph (wave writer) named after the famous physiologist Carl Ludwig and the precision engineer Gerhard Baltzar. Ludwig designed the machine and Baltzar produced it. This diagram is taken from the famous Zimmermann (1903/1983) Scientific Instrument catalogue. (b). The drum was lined with paper as described by Exner.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016818&req=5

fig3-2041669515593044: (a) An illustration of the Ludwig-Baltzar (in the original paper Exner wrote Balzar) kymograph (wave writer) named after the famous physiologist Carl Ludwig and the precision engineer Gerhard Baltzar. Ludwig designed the machine and Baltzar produced it. This diagram is taken from the famous Zimmermann (1903/1983) Scientific Instrument catalogue. (b). The drum was lined with paper as described by Exner.

Mentions: If one looks from a distance of about 80 cm and suddenly stops the movement, a movement aftereffect is obviously experienced. If one now looks with one eye through a reversion prism, such that the lines physically proceeding from left to right are seen as moving from the bottom to the top, rivalry of the visual fields is again perceived if both images of the drum are made to superimpose as far as this is possible. If one now stops the drum, a peculiar undulation of the two line systems shows up, which one recognizes as the expression of rivalry between the two aftereffects. Also, individual groups of lines of one direction with their illusory motion become visible as well as groups of the other movement direction (Figure 3).Figure 3.


Sigmund Exner ’ s (1887) Einige Beobachtungen ü ber Bewegungsnachbilder (Some Observations on Movement Aftereffects): An Illustrated Translation With Commentary
(a) An illustration of the Ludwig-Baltzar (in the original paper Exner wrote Balzar) kymograph (wave writer) named after the famous physiologist Carl Ludwig and the precision engineer Gerhard Baltzar. Ludwig designed the machine and Baltzar produced it. This diagram is taken from the famous Zimmermann (1903/1983) Scientific Instrument catalogue. (b). The drum was lined with paper as described by Exner.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016818&req=5

fig3-2041669515593044: (a) An illustration of the Ludwig-Baltzar (in the original paper Exner wrote Balzar) kymograph (wave writer) named after the famous physiologist Carl Ludwig and the precision engineer Gerhard Baltzar. Ludwig designed the machine and Baltzar produced it. This diagram is taken from the famous Zimmermann (1903/1983) Scientific Instrument catalogue. (b). The drum was lined with paper as described by Exner.
Mentions: If one looks from a distance of about 80 cm and suddenly stops the movement, a movement aftereffect is obviously experienced. If one now looks with one eye through a reversion prism, such that the lines physically proceeding from left to right are seen as moving from the bottom to the top, rivalry of the visual fields is again perceived if both images of the drum are made to superimpose as far as this is possible. If one now stops the drum, a peculiar undulation of the two line systems shows up, which one recognizes as the expression of rivalry between the two aftereffects. Also, individual groups of lines of one direction with their illusory motion become visible as well as groups of the other movement direction (Figure 3).Figure 3.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In his original contribution, Exner’s principal concern was a comparison between the properties of different aftereffects, and particularly to determine whether aftereffects of motion were similar to those of color and whether they could be encompassed within a unified physiological framework. Despite the fact that he was unable to answer his main question, there are some excellent—so far unknown—contributions in Exner’s paper. For example, he describes observations that can be related to binocular interaction, not only in motion aftereffects but also in rivalry. To the best of our knowledge, Exner provides the first description of binocular rivalry induced by differently moving patterns in each eye, for motion as well as for their aftereffects. Moreover, apart from several known, but beautifully addressed, phenomena he makes a clear distinction between motion in depth based on stimulus properties and motion in depth based on the interpretation of motion. That is, the experience of movement, as distinct from the perception of movement. The experience, unlike the perception, did not result in a motion aftereffect in depth.

No MeSH data available.