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Endocarditis due to Gemella haemolysans in a newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patient

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An 87-year-old Caucasian woman with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and COPD was admitted with 1-week duration of back pain and weight gain. The physical examination revealed jugular venous distention, rales in the left lower lung field, and severe pitting edema over lower extremities. As workup for leukocytosis, blood cultures grew Gemella haemolysans. Subsequently, a transthoracic echocardiogram revealed vegetation on the non-coronary aortic leaflet and mild aortic stenosis. She was treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with plasma cell myeloma, the monoclonal lambda type. This is the first reported case of G. haemolysans endocarditis in a multiple myeloma patient.

No MeSH data available.


TTE: a small, mobile 4–5 mm echodensity at the tip of the non-coronary leaflet.
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Figure 0001: TTE: a small, mobile 4–5 mm echodensity at the tip of the non-coronary leaflet.

Mentions: As workup for leukocytosis, peripheral blood culture grew Gemella haemolysans in two cultures. Subsequently, transthoracic echocardiogram revealed LVEF 60–65%, mild aortic stenosis, and one small vegetation on the non-coronary aortic leaflet (Fig. 1); pulmonary artery pressure was 65 mmHg. We diagnosed infective endocarditis (IE), and we started ampicillin (2 g every 6 h) and gentamicin (100 mg daily, renal dosing) according to the sensitivities. Patient's blood cultures were negative twice before discharge. We continued both ampicillin and gentamicin for 4 weeks from the date of first negative blood culture.


Endocarditis due to Gemella haemolysans in a newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patient
TTE: a small, mobile 4–5 mm echodensity at the tip of the non-coronary leaflet.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016745&req=5

Figure 0001: TTE: a small, mobile 4–5 mm echodensity at the tip of the non-coronary leaflet.
Mentions: As workup for leukocytosis, peripheral blood culture grew Gemella haemolysans in two cultures. Subsequently, transthoracic echocardiogram revealed LVEF 60–65%, mild aortic stenosis, and one small vegetation on the non-coronary aortic leaflet (Fig. 1); pulmonary artery pressure was 65 mmHg. We diagnosed infective endocarditis (IE), and we started ampicillin (2 g every 6 h) and gentamicin (100 mg daily, renal dosing) according to the sensitivities. Patient's blood cultures were negative twice before discharge. We continued both ampicillin and gentamicin for 4 weeks from the date of first negative blood culture.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

An 87-year-old Caucasian woman with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and COPD was admitted with 1-week duration of back pain and weight gain. The physical examination revealed jugular venous distention, rales in the left lower lung field, and severe pitting edema over lower extremities. As workup for leukocytosis, blood cultures grew Gemella haemolysans. Subsequently, a transthoracic echocardiogram revealed vegetation on the non-coronary aortic leaflet and mild aortic stenosis. She was treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with plasma cell myeloma, the monoclonal lambda type. This is the first reported case of G. haemolysans endocarditis in a multiple myeloma patient.

No MeSH data available.