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Cyto ‐ nuclear discordance suggests complex evolutionary history in the cave ‐ dwelling salamander, E urycea lucifuga

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ABSTRACT

Our understanding of the evolutionary history and ecology of cave‐associated species has been driven historically by studies of morphologically adapted cave‐restricted species. Our understanding of the evolutionary history and ecology of nonrestricted cave species, troglophiles, is limited to a few studies, which present differing accounts of troglophiles’ relationship with the cave habitat, and its impact on population dynamics. Here, we used phylogenetics, demographic statistics, and population genetic methods to study lineage divergence, dates of divergence, and population structure in the Cave Salamander, Eurycea lucifuga, across its range. In order to perform these analyses, we sampled 233 individuals from 49 populations, using sequence data from three gene loci as well as genotyping data from 19 newly designed microsatellite markers. We find, as in many other species studied in a phylogeographic context, discordance between patterns inferred from mitochondrial relationships and those inferred by nuclear markers indicating a complicated evolutionary history in this species. Our results suggest Pleistocene‐based divergence among three main lineages within E. lucifuga corresponding to the western, central, and eastern regions of the range, similar to patterns seen in species separated in multiple refugia during climatic shifts. The conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear patterns is consistent with what we would expect from secondary contact between regional populations following expansion from multiple refugia.

No MeSH data available.


Median‐joining networks for each gene locus generally reflect the relationships inferred by the tree‐building methods; the POMC network indicates that much of the clustering we see in the trees is reflective of the mitochondrial history of this species. Colors correspond to the regional lineage colors seen in Figure 1.
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ece32212-fig-0005: Median‐joining networks for each gene locus generally reflect the relationships inferred by the tree‐building methods; the POMC network indicates that much of the clustering we see in the trees is reflective of the mitochondrial history of this species. Colors correspond to the regional lineage colors seen in Figure 1.

Mentions: Diversity is extremely low in the nuclear locus, POMC, and highest in the mitochondrial locus cytb. When studying each sequenced locus separately as a haplotype network, it is clear that sharing of haplotypes among regions is common most frequently between the south‐central region and either the eastern or western regions. Both mitochondrial networks indicate that sharing of haplotypes among regions is common even between the eastern and western regions (Fig. 5).


Cyto ‐ nuclear discordance suggests complex evolutionary history in the cave ‐ dwelling salamander, E urycea lucifuga
Median‐joining networks for each gene locus generally reflect the relationships inferred by the tree‐building methods; the POMC network indicates that much of the clustering we see in the trees is reflective of the mitochondrial history of this species. Colors correspond to the regional lineage colors seen in Figure 1.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016636&req=5

ece32212-fig-0005: Median‐joining networks for each gene locus generally reflect the relationships inferred by the tree‐building methods; the POMC network indicates that much of the clustering we see in the trees is reflective of the mitochondrial history of this species. Colors correspond to the regional lineage colors seen in Figure 1.
Mentions: Diversity is extremely low in the nuclear locus, POMC, and highest in the mitochondrial locus cytb. When studying each sequenced locus separately as a haplotype network, it is clear that sharing of haplotypes among regions is common most frequently between the south‐central region and either the eastern or western regions. Both mitochondrial networks indicate that sharing of haplotypes among regions is common even between the eastern and western regions (Fig. 5).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Our understanding of the evolutionary history and ecology of cave‐associated species has been driven historically by studies of morphologically adapted cave‐restricted species. Our understanding of the evolutionary history and ecology of nonrestricted cave species, troglophiles, is limited to a few studies, which present differing accounts of troglophiles’ relationship with the cave habitat, and its impact on population dynamics. Here, we used phylogenetics, demographic statistics, and population genetic methods to study lineage divergence, dates of divergence, and population structure in the Cave Salamander, Eurycea lucifuga, across its range. In order to perform these analyses, we sampled 233 individuals from 49 populations, using sequence data from three gene loci as well as genotyping data from 19 newly designed microsatellite markers. We find, as in many other species studied in a phylogeographic context, discordance between patterns inferred from mitochondrial relationships and those inferred by nuclear markers indicating a complicated evolutionary history in this species. Our results suggest Pleistocene‐based divergence among three main lineages within E. lucifuga corresponding to the western, central, and eastern regions of the range, similar to patterns seen in species separated in multiple refugia during climatic shifts. The conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear patterns is consistent with what we would expect from secondary contact between regional populations following expansion from multiple refugia.

No MeSH data available.