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Magnetic resonance imaging of neonates in the magnetic resonance compatible incubator

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The authors present the first experience in neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations using an MR compatible incubator (INC) at the Institute of Mother and Child.

Material and methods: Forty-nine examinations of 47 newborns (20 girls, 27 boys) were performed using the GE Signa HDxt 1.5T system and INC Nomag IC 1.5. Demographic data, anesthetic methods and MRI findings in the INC in comparison with previously performed imaging were analyzed.

Results: Thirty-two neonates were prematurely born (68.1%) at gestational age 23–37 weeks, mean: 29.9 weeks. They were examined at 26 weeks postmenstrual age to 1 month corrected age, mean: 37.5 weeks. Body weight of newborns on the study day was 600–4300 g, mean: 2724 g. Seventeen (34.7%) children were examined in physiological sleep, 32 (65.3%) anesthetized. In none of them did anesthesiological complications or disease worsening occur. In 43 (91.5%) children brain MRI was performed, in 4 (8.5%) MRI of the spinal cord and canal and of the abdomen/pelvis. In children prenatally examined by MRI, the INC provided new diagnostic information in 5 (83.3%) cases, in neonates studied after birth by ultrasound in 32 (82%). Magnetic resonance imaging in the INC did not entail additional knowledge in 9 (18.7%) cases.

Conclusions: The INC enables MRI in preterm newborns and those with low/extremely low body weight. These studies are necessary to assess the extent of changes in the central nervous system and other organs. Incubator coils, designed specifically for neonates, allow more accurate diagnosis than previously used coils for adults. MRI results allow one to determine prognosis, for more accurate planning of diagnostics, helping to make appropriate therapeutic decisions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Preterm male neonate, born at the age of 23 gestational weeks, examined at the age of 26 weeks, body weight 600 g. Hemorrhage into the germinal matrix/brain tissue on the right, subependymal and intraventricular hemorrhage, bleeding into the choroid plexi (A). Cavities over both lateral ventricles (B)
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Figure 0005: Preterm male neonate, born at the age of 23 gestational weeks, examined at the age of 26 weeks, body weight 600 g. Hemorrhage into the germinal matrix/brain tissue on the right, subependymal and intraventricular hemorrhage, bleeding into the choroid plexi (A). Cavities over both lateral ventricles (B)

Mentions: Thanks to the advantages of INC, discussed above, we could safely perform MRI in our youngest premature baby at the age of 26 postmenstrual weeks, with the body weight of 600 g. In this case in several US examinations during the first 2 weeks of life the findings were so equivocal that it was decided to perform MRI at such an early stage (Figure 5). To our knowledge, this is the smallest baby examined so far – in those published papers in which the body weights of individual patients are given, we found data that so far the smallest babies weighed 1200 g [13] and 1400 g [22].


Magnetic resonance imaging of neonates in the magnetic resonance compatible incubator
Preterm male neonate, born at the age of 23 gestational weeks, examined at the age of 26 weeks, body weight 600 g. Hemorrhage into the germinal matrix/brain tissue on the right, subependymal and intraventricular hemorrhage, bleeding into the choroid plexi (A). Cavities over both lateral ventricles (B)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016588&req=5

Figure 0005: Preterm male neonate, born at the age of 23 gestational weeks, examined at the age of 26 weeks, body weight 600 g. Hemorrhage into the germinal matrix/brain tissue on the right, subependymal and intraventricular hemorrhage, bleeding into the choroid plexi (A). Cavities over both lateral ventricles (B)
Mentions: Thanks to the advantages of INC, discussed above, we could safely perform MRI in our youngest premature baby at the age of 26 postmenstrual weeks, with the body weight of 600 g. In this case in several US examinations during the first 2 weeks of life the findings were so equivocal that it was decided to perform MRI at such an early stage (Figure 5). To our knowledge, this is the smallest baby examined so far – in those published papers in which the body weights of individual patients are given, we found data that so far the smallest babies weighed 1200 g [13] and 1400 g [22].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The authors present the first experience in neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations using an MR compatible incubator (INC) at the Institute of Mother and Child.

Material and methods: Forty-nine examinations of 47 newborns (20 girls, 27 boys) were performed using the GE Signa HDxt 1.5T system and INC Nomag IC 1.5. Demographic data, anesthetic methods and MRI findings in the INC in comparison with previously performed imaging were analyzed.

Results: Thirty-two neonates were prematurely born (68.1%) at gestational age 23–37 weeks, mean: 29.9 weeks. They were examined at 26 weeks postmenstrual age to 1 month corrected age, mean: 37.5 weeks. Body weight of newborns on the study day was 600–4300 g, mean: 2724 g. Seventeen (34.7%) children were examined in physiological sleep, 32 (65.3%) anesthetized. In none of them did anesthesiological complications or disease worsening occur. In 43 (91.5%) children brain MRI was performed, in 4 (8.5%) MRI of the spinal cord and canal and of the abdomen/pelvis. In children prenatally examined by MRI, the INC provided new diagnostic information in 5 (83.3%) cases, in neonates studied after birth by ultrasound in 32 (82%). Magnetic resonance imaging in the INC did not entail additional knowledge in 9 (18.7%) cases.

Conclusions: The INC enables MRI in preterm newborns and those with low/extremely low body weight. These studies are necessary to assess the extent of changes in the central nervous system and other organs. Incubator coils, designed specifically for neonates, allow more accurate diagnosis than previously used coils for adults. MRI results allow one to determine prognosis, for more accurate planning of diagnostics, helping to make appropriate therapeutic decisions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus