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Organoids as a Model for Colorectal Cancer

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Modelling human diseases in in vitro systems is undisputedly an invaluable research tool, yet there are many limitations. Some of those limitations have been overcome through the introduction of organoid culture systems, which have revolutionised colorectal cancer research and enabled an array of new experimental techniques. This 3D system models the physiology, shape, dynamics and cell make-up of the intestinal epithelium producing a relevant and highly adaptable model system. The increased functional relevance of this model compared to the use of 2D cancer cell lines makes it an invaluable tool for both basic and translational research. As the limitations of this system are being overcome to make high-throughput assays possible, it is clear that organoids are becoming a mainstay of colorectal cancer research. This review aims to explore the advantages and limitations of this system and discusses the future directions enabled by this model.

No MeSH data available.


Organoid culture can be used as a model system for both basic and translational research
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Fig1: Organoid culture can be used as a model system for both basic and translational research

Mentions: Modelling disease in vitro has many advantages over the use of animals in research. Aside from the obvious ethical advantage, in vitro modelling of colorectal cancer enables genetic alterations to be made easily, quickly and relatively cheaply. However, traditional 2D culture techniques have held numerous disadvantages due to cell homology and lack of cell/cell interactions. The use of 3D culture techniques such as those described above opens a brand new range of possibilities for modelling colorectal cancer, enabling the exploitation of a brand new toolkit in researching this disease. Broadly speaking, CRC research can be subdivided into two main categories: basic research and translational research; and the use of organoids as a model system is already proving its utility in both areas (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Organoids as a Model for Colorectal Cancer
Organoid culture can be used as a model system for both basic and translational research
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016547&req=5

Fig1: Organoid culture can be used as a model system for both basic and translational research
Mentions: Modelling disease in vitro has many advantages over the use of animals in research. Aside from the obvious ethical advantage, in vitro modelling of colorectal cancer enables genetic alterations to be made easily, quickly and relatively cheaply. However, traditional 2D culture techniques have held numerous disadvantages due to cell homology and lack of cell/cell interactions. The use of 3D culture techniques such as those described above opens a brand new range of possibilities for modelling colorectal cancer, enabling the exploitation of a brand new toolkit in researching this disease. Broadly speaking, CRC research can be subdivided into two main categories: basic research and translational research; and the use of organoids as a model system is already proving its utility in both areas (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Modelling human diseases in in vitro systems is undisputedly an invaluable research tool, yet there are many limitations. Some of those limitations have been overcome through the introduction of organoid culture systems, which have revolutionised colorectal cancer research and enabled an array of new experimental techniques. This 3D system models the physiology, shape, dynamics and cell make-up of the intestinal epithelium producing a relevant and highly adaptable model system. The increased functional relevance of this model compared to the use of 2D cancer cell lines makes it an invaluable tool for both basic and translational research. As the limitations of this system are being overcome to make high-throughput assays possible, it is clear that organoids are becoming a mainstay of colorectal cancer research. This review aims to explore the advantages and limitations of this system and discusses the future directions enabled by this model.

No MeSH data available.