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A technique to determine the fastest age-adjusted masters marathon world records

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction/purpose: This study’s purpose was to develop and employ a technique to determine the fastest masters marathon world records (WR), ages 35–79 years, adjusted for age (WRadj).

Methods: From single-age WR data, a best-fit polynomial curve (WRpred1) was developed for the larger age range of 29–80 years for women and 30–80 years for men to improve curve stability in the 35–79 years range. Due to the relatively large degree of data scatter about the curve and the resultant age bias in favor of older runners, a subsample was constituted consisting of those with the lowest WR/WRpred1 ratio within each five-year age group (N = 11). A new polynomial best-fit curve (WRpred2) was developed from this subsample to become the standard against which WR would be compared across age. WRadj was computed from WR/WRpred2 for all runners, 35–79 years, from which the top ten fastest were then determined.

Results: The WRpred2 model reduced data scatter and eliminated the age bias. Tatyana Pozdniakova, 50 years, WR = 2:31:05, WRadj = 2:12:40; and Ed Whitlock, 73 years, WR = 2:54:48, WRadj = 1:59:57, had the fastest WRadj for women and men, respectively.

Conclusions: This technique of iterative curve-fitting may be an optimal way of determining the fastest masters WRadj and may also be useful in better understanding the upper limits of human performance by age.

No MeSH data available.


Best-fit resultant curves from the subsample (N = 11) of lowest WR/WRpred2 ratio (and, therefore, fastest WRadj) superimposed over the Fig. 1scatterplot for each sex. The top ten WRadj marathoners within the 35–79 age range are indicated by open diamonds. The open WR for each sex is indicated by open circles
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Fig2: Best-fit resultant curves from the subsample (N = 11) of lowest WR/WRpred2 ratio (and, therefore, fastest WRadj) superimposed over the Fig. 1scatterplot for each sex. The top ten WRadj marathoners within the 35–79 age range are indicated by open diamonds. The open WR for each sex is indicated by open circles

Mentions: WRadj was calculated for each WR holder 35–79 years, using the open WRpred2 of 2:16:13 for women and 2:02:14 for men multiplied by WR/WRpred2. Figure 2 shows the resultant best-fit curve, WRpred2, superimposed over the scatterplot of age versus WR for each marathoner in the 11 age groups. Data points corresponding to the lowest “altitude” relative to the standard curve are those with the fastest WRadj times. Therefore, Tatyana Pozdniakova (50 years, WR = 2:31:05, WRadj = 2:12:40) and Ed Whitlock (73 years, WR = 2:54:48, WRadj = 1:59:57) are the fastest WRadj holders of all time for women and men, respectively. The resulting top ten WRadj of all time for the 35–79 years masters age range are labeled within Fig. 2 and detailed in Table 1.Fig. 2


A technique to determine the fastest age-adjusted masters marathon world records
Best-fit resultant curves from the subsample (N = 11) of lowest WR/WRpred2 ratio (and, therefore, fastest WRadj) superimposed over the Fig. 1scatterplot for each sex. The top ten WRadj marathoners within the 35–79 age range are indicated by open diamonds. The open WR for each sex is indicated by open circles
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016493&req=5

Fig2: Best-fit resultant curves from the subsample (N = 11) of lowest WR/WRpred2 ratio (and, therefore, fastest WRadj) superimposed over the Fig. 1scatterplot for each sex. The top ten WRadj marathoners within the 35–79 age range are indicated by open diamonds. The open WR for each sex is indicated by open circles
Mentions: WRadj was calculated for each WR holder 35–79 years, using the open WRpred2 of 2:16:13 for women and 2:02:14 for men multiplied by WR/WRpred2. Figure 2 shows the resultant best-fit curve, WRpred2, superimposed over the scatterplot of age versus WR for each marathoner in the 11 age groups. Data points corresponding to the lowest “altitude” relative to the standard curve are those with the fastest WRadj times. Therefore, Tatyana Pozdniakova (50 years, WR = 2:31:05, WRadj = 2:12:40) and Ed Whitlock (73 years, WR = 2:54:48, WRadj = 1:59:57) are the fastest WRadj holders of all time for women and men, respectively. The resulting top ten WRadj of all time for the 35–79 years masters age range are labeled within Fig. 2 and detailed in Table 1.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction/purpose: This study’s purpose was to develop and employ a technique to determine the fastest masters marathon world records (WR), ages 35–79 years, adjusted for age (WRadj).

Methods: From single-age WR data, a best-fit polynomial curve (WRpred1) was developed for the larger age range of 29–80 years for women and 30–80 years for men to improve curve stability in the 35–79 years range. Due to the relatively large degree of data scatter about the curve and the resultant age bias in favor of older runners, a subsample was constituted consisting of those with the lowest WR/WRpred1 ratio within each five-year age group (N = 11). A new polynomial best-fit curve (WRpred2) was developed from this subsample to become the standard against which WR would be compared across age. WRadj was computed from WR/WRpred2 for all runners, 35–79 years, from which the top ten fastest were then determined.

Results: The WRpred2 model reduced data scatter and eliminated the age bias. Tatyana Pozdniakova, 50 years, WR = 2:31:05, WRadj = 2:12:40; and Ed Whitlock, 73 years, WR = 2:54:48, WRadj = 1:59:57, had the fastest WRadj for women and men, respectively.

Conclusions: This technique of iterative curve-fitting may be an optimal way of determining the fastest masters WRadj and may also be useful in better understanding the upper limits of human performance by age.

No MeSH data available.