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Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice.

Methods: The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD).

Results: In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P < 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P < 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits.

Conclusion: These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of the Lizhong Tang extract on the Intestinal transit rates (%) values in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Intestinal transit rates (ITRs) (%) values of the STZ mice induced 2 mo before the i.g. administration of Evans blue (n = 12 per bar). The bars represent mean values ± SE. bP < 0.01; significantly different from the STZ-induced diabetic controls. CTRL: Control; Lope.: Loperamide.
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Figure 4: Effects of the Lizhong Tang extract on the Intestinal transit rates (%) values in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Intestinal transit rates (ITRs) (%) values of the STZ mice induced 2 mo before the i.g. administration of Evans blue (n = 12 per bar). The bars represent mean values ± SE. bP < 0.01; significantly different from the STZ-induced diabetic controls. CTRL: Control; Lope.: Loperamide.

Mentions: We used the AA and STZ-induced diabetic mouse models of experimental GMD to examine the effect of the Lizhong Tang extract on GI motility. As mentioned above, the AA mouse model showed a significant retardation of ITR (%) [23.2% ± 1.5% (P < 0.01 vs normal); Figure 3]. However, a significant inhibition of this retardation was observed when the mice were intragastrically administered 0.01, 0.1, or 1 g/kg of the Lizhong Tang extract [25.3% ± 2.4%, 34.5% ± 2.1% (P < 0.01) and 51.8% ± 5.7% (P < 0.01), respectively; Figure 3]. No abnormal clinical signs or changes were observed in the AA mice after administration of the Lizhong Tang extract. In addition, loperamide decreased the ITR (%) in the AA mice [13.5% ± 2.4% (P < 0.01)], and the Lizhong Tang extract increased this value [26.7% ± 2.1% (P < 0.01); Figure 3]. Furthermore, the STZ-induced diabetic mice also showed a significant ITR (%) retardation (44.1% ± 3.5%; Figure 4), which was also significantly inhibited by treatment with the Lizhong Tang extract at 0.01, 0.1 or 1 g/kg [53.8% ± 1.5% (P < 0.01), 57.7% ± 1.4% (P < 0.01) and 71.5% ± 3.0% (P < 0.01), respectively; Figure 4]. No abnormal clinical signs or changes were observed in the STZ-induced diabetic mice after the administration of the Lizhong Tang extract. In addition, loperamide decreased the ITR in the STZ-induced diabetic mice [20.6% ± 1.8% (P < 0.01)], and the Lizhong Tang extract increased this value [40.6% ± 2.2% (P < 0.01); Figure 4]. These results indicate that the Lizhong Tang extract increased the ITR in mice with GMD.


Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice
Effects of the Lizhong Tang extract on the Intestinal transit rates (%) values in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Intestinal transit rates (ITRs) (%) values of the STZ mice induced 2 mo before the i.g. administration of Evans blue (n = 12 per bar). The bars represent mean values ± SE. bP < 0.01; significantly different from the STZ-induced diabetic controls. CTRL: Control; Lope.: Loperamide.
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Figure 4: Effects of the Lizhong Tang extract on the Intestinal transit rates (%) values in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Intestinal transit rates (ITRs) (%) values of the STZ mice induced 2 mo before the i.g. administration of Evans blue (n = 12 per bar). The bars represent mean values ± SE. bP < 0.01; significantly different from the STZ-induced diabetic controls. CTRL: Control; Lope.: Loperamide.
Mentions: We used the AA and STZ-induced diabetic mouse models of experimental GMD to examine the effect of the Lizhong Tang extract on GI motility. As mentioned above, the AA mouse model showed a significant retardation of ITR (%) [23.2% ± 1.5% (P < 0.01 vs normal); Figure 3]. However, a significant inhibition of this retardation was observed when the mice were intragastrically administered 0.01, 0.1, or 1 g/kg of the Lizhong Tang extract [25.3% ± 2.4%, 34.5% ± 2.1% (P < 0.01) and 51.8% ± 5.7% (P < 0.01), respectively; Figure 3]. No abnormal clinical signs or changes were observed in the AA mice after administration of the Lizhong Tang extract. In addition, loperamide decreased the ITR (%) in the AA mice [13.5% ± 2.4% (P < 0.01)], and the Lizhong Tang extract increased this value [26.7% ± 2.1% (P < 0.01); Figure 3]. Furthermore, the STZ-induced diabetic mice also showed a significant ITR (%) retardation (44.1% ± 3.5%; Figure 4), which was also significantly inhibited by treatment with the Lizhong Tang extract at 0.01, 0.1 or 1 g/kg [53.8% ± 1.5% (P < 0.01), 57.7% ± 1.4% (P < 0.01) and 71.5% ± 3.0% (P < 0.01), respectively; Figure 4]. No abnormal clinical signs or changes were observed in the STZ-induced diabetic mice after the administration of the Lizhong Tang extract. In addition, loperamide decreased the ITR in the STZ-induced diabetic mice [20.6% ± 1.8% (P < 0.01)], and the Lizhong Tang extract increased this value [40.6% ± 2.2% (P < 0.01); Figure 4]. These results indicate that the Lizhong Tang extract increased the ITR in mice with GMD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice.

Methods: The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD).

Results: In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% &plusmn; 1.9% vs 65.2% &plusmn; 1.8%, P &lt; 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% &plusmn; 1.9% vs 83.8% &plusmn; 1.9%, P &lt; 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% &plusmn; 1.9% vs 66.8% &plusmn; 2.1%, P &lt; 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% &plusmn; 1.9% vs 72.5% &plusmn; 1.7%, P &lt; 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits.

Conclusion: These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract.

No MeSH data available.