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Urine synaptopodin excretion is an important marker of glomerular disease progression

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background/aims:: Podocytes play an important role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and in formation of the slit diaphragm. Podocyte loss is associated with chronic kidney disease progression, but it is not clear whether urinary podocyte proteins in urine reflect the clinical extent of glomerular damage. We investigated the correlation between the amounts of urinary podocyte proteins and renal function and albuminuria.

Methods:: The study enrolled 33 patients with diabetic kidney disease or glomerular disease and measured urinary podocytes proteins using Western blotting. Urinary podocyte proteins were measured according to the density of the bands on Western blotting. We measured serum creatinine and the spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio as markers of renal damage, and compared the correlation of urinary podocyte protein in the glomerular disease patients.

Results:: The mean patient age was 49.3 ± 16.5 years, the mean serum creatinine level was 2.30 ± 1.76 mg/dL, and the mean albumin/creatinine ratio was 4.85 ± 3.52. Among the podocyte proteins, urine synaptopodin showed strong correlation with serum creatinine by multivariate regression analysis (p < 0.001) and showed linear correlation (r = 0.429, p < 0.01). Urine podocyte proteins were increased in patients with diabetes, and synaptopodin showed the greatest significant difference (7.68 ± 5.61 vs. 2.56 ± 3.11, p < 0.001), but this might be associated with renal impairment. The urine albumin excretion did not differ between the diabetics and non-diabetics (p = 0.73).

Conclusions:: Urine synaptopodin is associated with serum creatinine elevation in the patients with glomerulonephritis including diabetic kidney disease regardless of urine albumin excretion. We suggest that the urine synaptopodin level can predict glomerular damage independently of the urine albumin excretion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Urine synaptopodin excretion showed significant statistical correlation with serum creatinine (SCr) in all the patients with glomerulopathy.
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f1-kjim-2015-226: Urine synaptopodin excretion showed significant statistical correlation with serum creatinine (SCr) in all the patients with glomerulopathy.

Mentions: The serum creatinine level showed a strong correlation with age, as expected (r = 0.483, p < 0.01). However, urine albumin/Cr ratio was not correlated with any of the podocyte proteins. Among the podocyte proteins, only synaptopodin showed strong association with serum creatinine by multivariate regression analysis, but the diabetes did not affect to serum creatinine elevation (p < 0.001) (Table 2). Also, urine synaptopodin was strongly correlated with serum creatinine comparing with other podocyte proteins by Kendal’s tau correlation test (r = 0.429, p < 0.01) (Fig. 1). There was no significant statistic correlation between serum creatinine and slit diaphragms; nephrin (r = –0.020, p = 0.910), podocin (r = 0.181, p = 0.314), and podocalyxin (r = 0.180, p = 0.316). Comparing three groups of the patient by eGFR, urine synaptopodin was markedly elevated in the patients with lower eGFR (p = 0.0006) (Fig. 2).


Urine synaptopodin excretion is an important marker of glomerular disease progression
Urine synaptopodin excretion showed significant statistical correlation with serum creatinine (SCr) in all the patients with glomerulopathy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016285&req=5

f1-kjim-2015-226: Urine synaptopodin excretion showed significant statistical correlation with serum creatinine (SCr) in all the patients with glomerulopathy.
Mentions: The serum creatinine level showed a strong correlation with age, as expected (r = 0.483, p < 0.01). However, urine albumin/Cr ratio was not correlated with any of the podocyte proteins. Among the podocyte proteins, only synaptopodin showed strong association with serum creatinine by multivariate regression analysis, but the diabetes did not affect to serum creatinine elevation (p < 0.001) (Table 2). Also, urine synaptopodin was strongly correlated with serum creatinine comparing with other podocyte proteins by Kendal’s tau correlation test (r = 0.429, p < 0.01) (Fig. 1). There was no significant statistic correlation between serum creatinine and slit diaphragms; nephrin (r = –0.020, p = 0.910), podocin (r = 0.181, p = 0.314), and podocalyxin (r = 0.180, p = 0.316). Comparing three groups of the patient by eGFR, urine synaptopodin was markedly elevated in the patients with lower eGFR (p = 0.0006) (Fig. 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background/aims:: Podocytes play an important role in maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier and in formation of the slit diaphragm. Podocyte loss is associated with chronic kidney disease progression, but it is not clear whether urinary podocyte proteins in urine reflect the clinical extent of glomerular damage. We investigated the correlation between the amounts of urinary podocyte proteins and renal function and albuminuria.

Methods:: The study enrolled 33 patients with diabetic kidney disease or glomerular disease and measured urinary podocytes proteins using Western blotting. Urinary podocyte proteins were measured according to the density of the bands on Western blotting. We measured serum creatinine and the spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio as markers of renal damage, and compared the correlation of urinary podocyte protein in the glomerular disease patients.

Results:: The mean patient age was 49.3 &plusmn; 16.5 years, the mean serum creatinine level was 2.30 &plusmn; 1.76 mg/dL, and the mean albumin/creatinine ratio was 4.85 &plusmn; 3.52. Among the podocyte proteins, urine synaptopodin showed strong correlation with serum creatinine by multivariate regression analysis (p &lt; 0.001) and showed linear correlation (r = 0.429, p &lt; 0.01). Urine podocyte proteins were increased in patients with diabetes, and synaptopodin showed the greatest significant difference (7.68 &plusmn; 5.61 vs. 2.56 &plusmn; 3.11, p &lt; 0.001), but this might be associated with renal impairment. The urine albumin excretion did not differ between the diabetics and non-diabetics (p = 0.73).

Conclusions:: Urine synaptopodin is associated with serum creatinine elevation in the patients with glomerulonephritis including diabetic kidney disease regardless of urine albumin excretion. We suggest that the urine synaptopodin level can predict glomerular damage independently of the urine albumin excretion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus