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Qualitative Analysis of Surveyed Emergency Responders and the Identified Factors That Affect First Stage of Primary Triage Decision-Making of Mass Casualty Incidents

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: After all large-scale disasters multiple papers are published describing the shortcomings of the triage methods utilized. This paper uses medical provider input to help describe attributes and patient characteristics that impact triage decisions.

Methods: A survey distributed electronically to medical providers with and without disaster experience. Questions asked included what disaster experiences they had, and to rank six attributes in order of importance regarding triage.

Results: 403 unique completed surveys were analyzed. 92% practiced a structural triage approach with the rest reporting they used “gestalt”.(gut feeling) Twelve per cent were identified as having placed patients in an expectant category during triage. Respiratory status, ability to speak, perfusion/pulse were all ranked in the top three. Gut feeling regardless of statistical analysis was fourth. Supplies were ranked in the top four when analyzed for those who had placed patients in the expectant category.

Conclusion: Primary triage decisions in a mass casualty scenario are multifactorial and encompass patient mobility, life saving interventions, situational instincts, and logistics.

No MeSH data available.


Table 3: Ranking differences of criteria separating experienced, black tag with and without disaster experience (163) vs. no disaster experience (240). (p<0.05 sig)
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table3: Table 3: Ranking differences of criteria separating experienced, black tag with and without disaster experience (163) vs. no disaster experience (240). (p<0.05 sig)

Mentions: ‘Respiratory status, ability to speak, perfusion/pulse, and gut feeling’ factors were ranked in the top four by the majority of the 403 respondents. The mean rankings for five of the six variables (all but ‘gut feeling’) differed by experience groups and were all statistically significant depending on disaster experience (Table 3).


Qualitative Analysis of Surveyed Emergency Responders and the Identified Factors That Affect First Stage of Primary Triage Decision-Making of Mass Casualty Incidents
Table 3: Ranking differences of criteria separating experienced, black tag with and without disaster experience (163) vs. no disaster experience (240). (p<0.05 sig)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5016230&req=5

table3: Table 3: Ranking differences of criteria separating experienced, black tag with and without disaster experience (163) vs. no disaster experience (240). (p<0.05 sig)
Mentions: ‘Respiratory status, ability to speak, perfusion/pulse, and gut feeling’ factors were ranked in the top four by the majority of the 403 respondents. The mean rankings for five of the six variables (all but ‘gut feeling’) differed by experience groups and were all statistically significant depending on disaster experience (Table 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: After all large-scale disasters multiple papers are published describing the shortcomings of the triage methods utilized. This paper uses medical provider input to help describe attributes and patient characteristics that impact triage decisions.

Methods: A survey distributed electronically to medical providers with and without disaster experience. Questions asked included what disaster experiences they had, and to rank six attributes in order of importance regarding triage.

Results: 403 unique completed surveys were analyzed. 92% practiced a structural triage approach with the rest reporting they used &ldquo;gestalt&rdquo;.(gut feeling) Twelve per cent were identified as having placed patients in an expectant category during triage. Respiratory status, ability to speak, perfusion/pulse were all ranked in the top three. Gut feeling regardless of statistical analysis was fourth. Supplies were ranked in the top four when analyzed for those who had placed patients in the expectant category.

Conclusion: Primary triage decisions in a mass casualty scenario are multifactorial and encompass patient mobility, life saving interventions, situational instincts, and logistics.

No MeSH data available.