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Care Setting Intensity and Outcomes After Emergency Department Presentation Among Patients With Acute Heart Failure

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) presenting to the emergency department (ED) can be admitted to care settings of different intensity, where the intensive care unit (ICU) is the highest intensity, ward admission is intermediate intensity, and those discharged home are of lowest intensity. Despite the costs associated with higher‐intensity care, little is known about disposition decisions and outcomes of HF patients treated in different care settings.

Methods and results: We identified predictors of ICU or ward admission and determined whether survival differs in patients admitted to higher‐intensity versus lower‐intensity care settings (ie, ICU vs ward, or ward vs ED‐discharged). Among 9054 patients (median, 78 years; 51% men) presenting to an ED in Ontario, Canada, 1163 were ICU‐admitted, 5240 ward‐admitted, and 2651 were ED‐discharged. Predictors of ICU (vs ward) admission included: use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.36–2.98), higher respiratory rate (OR, 1.10 per 5 breaths/min; 95% CI, 1.05–1.15), and lower oxygen saturation (OR, 0.90 per 5%; 95% CI, 0.86–0.94; all P<0.001). Predictors of ward‐admitted versus ED‐discharged were similar. Propensity‐matched analysis comparing lower‐risk ICU to ward‐admitted patients demonstrated a nonsignificant trend at 100 days (relative risk [RR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.43–1.10; P=0.148). At 1 year, however, survival was higher among those initially admitted to ICU (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49–0.94; P=0.022). There was no survival difference among low‐risk ward‐admitted versus ED‐discharged patients.

Conclusions: Respiratory factors were associated with admission to higher‐intensity settings. There was no difference in early survival between some lower‐risk patients admitted to higher‐intensity units compared to those treated in lower‐intensity settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multivariable predictors of hospitalization on the ward (vs ED discharge) with P<0.05 in multivariable model. OR >1 indicates higher odds of ward admission. bpm indicates beats per minute; CV, cardiovascular; ECG, electrocardiogram; ED, emergency department; EMS, emergency medical services; fib, fibrillation; NH, nursing home; NPPV, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation; OR, odds ratio.
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jah31644-fig-0003: Multivariable predictors of hospitalization on the ward (vs ED discharge) with P<0.05 in multivariable model. OR >1 indicates higher odds of ward admission. bpm indicates beats per minute; CV, cardiovascular; ECG, electrocardiogram; ED, emergency department; EMS, emergency medical services; fib, fibrillation; NH, nursing home; NPPV, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation; OR, odds ratio.

Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates the characteristics associated with increased odds of admission to hospital ward versus discharge home after accounting for clustering within hospitals in a multivariable regression model (c‐statistic=0.742). Factors associated with ward admission (adjusted OR >1) included several respiratory variables, including higher respiratory rate, lower oxygen saturation, and need for NPPV (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.08, 30.76; P=0.041). Presentation to a teaching hospital was associated with lower odds (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.22, 0.71; P=0.002), whereas small hospitals exhibited a nonsignificant trend to higher odds (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 0.42, 16.59) of ward admission, controlling for all other significant covariates. Other prominent factors associated with ward admission (vs ED discharge) were elevated leukocyte count, abnormal troponin, and higher heart rate. Occurrence of a cardiovascular complication in the ED (OR, 10.14; 95% CI, 1.43, 71.93; P=0.021) was associated with ward admission (vs discharge), but the OR and upper confidence limits exceeded the x‐axis scale and are not displayed in Figure 3.


Care Setting Intensity and Outcomes After Emergency Department Presentation Among Patients With Acute Heart Failure
Multivariable predictors of hospitalization on the ward (vs ED discharge) with P<0.05 in multivariable model. OR >1 indicates higher odds of ward admission. bpm indicates beats per minute; CV, cardiovascular; ECG, electrocardiogram; ED, emergency department; EMS, emergency medical services; fib, fibrillation; NH, nursing home; NPPV, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation; OR, odds ratio.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy-nc-nd
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015368&req=5

jah31644-fig-0003: Multivariable predictors of hospitalization on the ward (vs ED discharge) with P<0.05 in multivariable model. OR >1 indicates higher odds of ward admission. bpm indicates beats per minute; CV, cardiovascular; ECG, electrocardiogram; ED, emergency department; EMS, emergency medical services; fib, fibrillation; NH, nursing home; NPPV, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation; OR, odds ratio.
Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates the characteristics associated with increased odds of admission to hospital ward versus discharge home after accounting for clustering within hospitals in a multivariable regression model (c‐statistic=0.742). Factors associated with ward admission (adjusted OR >1) included several respiratory variables, including higher respiratory rate, lower oxygen saturation, and need for NPPV (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.08, 30.76; P=0.041). Presentation to a teaching hospital was associated with lower odds (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.22, 0.71; P=0.002), whereas small hospitals exhibited a nonsignificant trend to higher odds (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 0.42, 16.59) of ward admission, controlling for all other significant covariates. Other prominent factors associated with ward admission (vs ED discharge) were elevated leukocyte count, abnormal troponin, and higher heart rate. Occurrence of a cardiovascular complication in the ED (OR, 10.14; 95% CI, 1.43, 71.93; P=0.021) was associated with ward admission (vs discharge), but the OR and upper confidence limits exceeded the x‐axis scale and are not displayed in Figure 3.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) presenting to the emergency department (ED) can be admitted to care settings of different intensity, where the intensive care unit (ICU) is the highest intensity, ward admission is intermediate intensity, and those discharged home are of lowest intensity. Despite the costs associated with higher&#8208;intensity care, little is known about disposition decisions and outcomes of HF patients treated in different care settings.

Methods and results: We identified predictors of ICU or ward admission and determined whether survival differs in patients admitted to higher&#8208;intensity versus lower&#8208;intensity care settings (ie, ICU vs ward, or ward vs ED&#8208;discharged). Among 9054 patients (median, 78&nbsp;years; 51% men) presenting to an ED in Ontario, Canada, 1163 were ICU&#8208;admitted, 5240 ward&#8208;admitted, and 2651 were ED&#8208;discharged. Predictors of ICU (vs ward) admission included: use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.36&ndash;2.98), higher respiratory rate (OR, 1.10 per 5&nbsp;breaths/min; 95% CI, 1.05&ndash;1.15), and lower oxygen saturation (OR, 0.90 per 5%; 95% CI, 0.86&ndash;0.94; all P&lt;0.001). Predictors of ward&#8208;admitted versus ED&#8208;discharged were similar. Propensity&#8208;matched analysis comparing lower&#8208;risk ICU to ward&#8208;admitted patients demonstrated a nonsignificant trend at 100&nbsp;days (relative risk [RR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.43&ndash;1.10; P=0.148). At 1 year, however, survival was higher among those initially admitted to ICU (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49&ndash;0.94; P=0.022). There was no survival difference among low&#8208;risk ward&#8208;admitted versus ED&#8208;discharged patients.

Conclusions: Respiratory factors were associated with admission to higher&#8208;intensity settings. There was no difference in early survival between some lower&#8208;risk patients admitted to higher&#8208;intensity units compared to those treated in lower&#8208;intensity settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus