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Combination of platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhances tendon – bone healing in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

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ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the potency of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to promote tendon–bone healing in a rabbit model.

Methods: In the in vitro study, the effects of PRP on osteogenic induction of BMSCs were analysed. Later, PRP with or without BMSCs was used in the rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Specimens were harvested 8 weeks postoperatively to evaluate tendon–bone healing by histology, radiology, and biomechanical testing.

Results: The in vitro study revealed that collagen I, osteocalcin, and osteopontin expression was higher in BMSCs co-cultured with PRP for 14 days. The in vivo study revealed a more mature tendon–bone interface using light microscopy, a more newly formed bone at the bone tunnel walls detected by micro-computed tomography, and a significantly higher failure load as assessed by biomechanical testing in the BMSC + PRP group than in the control and PRP groups.

Conclusions: These results indicate that the combination of PRP and BMSCs promotes tendon–bone healing and has potential for clinical use.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13018-016-0433-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Representative transverse (a1, b1, and c1), coronal (a2, b2, and c2), and sagittal (A3, b3, and c3) section micro-computed tomography images in the three groups. No obvious mineralised tissue had formed in the tibial bone tunnels in the control group (a1–3). Clear mineralised tissue had formed at the tendon–bone interface in the PRP (b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (c1–3). The red arrows point to the newly formed mineralized tissue around the wall of the tibial bone tunnel
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Fig7: Representative transverse (a1, b1, and c1), coronal (a2, b2, and c2), and sagittal (A3, b3, and c3) section micro-computed tomography images in the three groups. No obvious mineralised tissue had formed in the tibial bone tunnels in the control group (a1–3). Clear mineralised tissue had formed at the tendon–bone interface in the PRP (b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (c1–3). The red arrows point to the newly formed mineralized tissue around the wall of the tibial bone tunnel

Mentions: The transverse, coronal, and sagittal section images of the tibial bone tunnel were reconstructed with high-resolution micro-CT. Newly formed mineralised tissue was evident along the entire length of the bone tunnel by screening slices of each sample. The control micro-CT images showed no obvious mineralised tissue in the tibial bone tunnels 8 weeks postoperatively (Fig. 7a1–3). Obvious signals were detected in the bone tunnels of the PRP (Fig. 7b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (Fig. 7c1–3), indicating mineralised tissue formation at the tendon–bone interface. A stronger signal was observed in the BMSC + PRP group than in the PRP group, indicative of more mineralised tissue formation.Fig. 7


Combination of platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhances tendon – bone healing in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
Representative transverse (a1, b1, and c1), coronal (a2, b2, and c2), and sagittal (A3, b3, and c3) section micro-computed tomography images in the three groups. No obvious mineralised tissue had formed in the tibial bone tunnels in the control group (a1–3). Clear mineralised tissue had formed at the tendon–bone interface in the PRP (b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (c1–3). The red arrows point to the newly formed mineralized tissue around the wall of the tibial bone tunnel
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015347&req=5

Fig7: Representative transverse (a1, b1, and c1), coronal (a2, b2, and c2), and sagittal (A3, b3, and c3) section micro-computed tomography images in the three groups. No obvious mineralised tissue had formed in the tibial bone tunnels in the control group (a1–3). Clear mineralised tissue had formed at the tendon–bone interface in the PRP (b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (c1–3). The red arrows point to the newly formed mineralized tissue around the wall of the tibial bone tunnel
Mentions: The transverse, coronal, and sagittal section images of the tibial bone tunnel were reconstructed with high-resolution micro-CT. Newly formed mineralised tissue was evident along the entire length of the bone tunnel by screening slices of each sample. The control micro-CT images showed no obvious mineralised tissue in the tibial bone tunnels 8 weeks postoperatively (Fig. 7a1–3). Obvious signals were detected in the bone tunnels of the PRP (Fig. 7b1–3) and BMSC + PRP groups (Fig. 7c1–3), indicating mineralised tissue formation at the tendon–bone interface. A stronger signal was observed in the BMSC + PRP group than in the PRP group, indicative of more mineralised tissue formation.Fig. 7

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the potency of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to promote tendon–bone healing in a rabbit model.

Methods: In the in vitro study, the effects of PRP on osteogenic induction of BMSCs were analysed. Later, PRP with or without BMSCs was used in the rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Specimens were harvested 8 weeks postoperatively to evaluate tendon–bone healing by histology, radiology, and biomechanical testing.

Results: The in vitro study revealed that collagen I, osteocalcin, and osteopontin expression was higher in BMSCs co-cultured with PRP for 14 days. The in vivo study revealed a more mature tendon–bone interface using light microscopy, a more newly formed bone at the bone tunnel walls detected by micro-computed tomography, and a significantly higher failure load as assessed by biomechanical testing in the BMSC + PRP group than in the control and PRP groups.

Conclusions: These results indicate that the combination of PRP and BMSCs promotes tendon–bone healing and has potential for clinical use.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13018-016-0433-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.