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Perceptions of medical doctors on bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to investigate medical doctors’ awareness of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and the status of dental referrals.

Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to medical doctors practicing internal medicine, family medicine, and orthopedics at the 6 tertiary medical centers located in Seoul, Korea. The survey consisted of 22 questions regarding the general characteristics, bisphosphonate therapy, awareness of BRONJ, and implementation of dental referrals.

Results: Among 192 medical doctors, 21.9 % had not heard of the disease. Only 8.9 % correctly answered all 5 questions testing BRONJ knowledge. Dental referrals made by medical doctors were implemented in less than 30 % of the total patients. Oncology specialists most often recognized the necessity of dental referrals followed in decreasing order by endocrinology, rheumatology, family medicine, and orthopedic specialists.

Conclusion: Given medical doctors’ low BRONJ perception and implementation level of dental referrals, enhancing information dissemination on BRONJ and development of a highly accessible educational program recognizing the need for dental referrals are urgent.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12903-016-0290-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Reasons why medical doctors do not make dental referrals
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Fig1: Reasons why medical doctors do not make dental referrals

Mentions: The perception of the necessity of dental referrals according to the areas of specialty was highest in oncology (4.30 ± 1.08), followed by endocrinology (3.65 ± 0.98), rheumatology (3.44 ± 1.42), family medicine (3.36 ± 1.22), and orthopedics (3.12 ± 1.21) (P < .05). However, the degree of dental referrals did not show a statistically significant difference among the areas of specialty (P > 0.05). The reasons for not making dental referrals differed among the specialties (Fig. 1). In family medicine, endocrinology, and rheumatology, the majority answered that they did not feel the necessity of dental referrals; in orthopedics, it was difficult to earn patient cooperation due to financial, time, and motivational issues; and in oncology, they thought that the treatment of systemic disease was more urgent than dental treatment.Fig. 1


Perceptions of medical doctors on bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw
Reasons why medical doctors do not make dental referrals
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015333&req=5

Fig1: Reasons why medical doctors do not make dental referrals
Mentions: The perception of the necessity of dental referrals according to the areas of specialty was highest in oncology (4.30 ± 1.08), followed by endocrinology (3.65 ± 0.98), rheumatology (3.44 ± 1.42), family medicine (3.36 ± 1.22), and orthopedics (3.12 ± 1.21) (P < .05). However, the degree of dental referrals did not show a statistically significant difference among the areas of specialty (P > 0.05). The reasons for not making dental referrals differed among the specialties (Fig. 1). In family medicine, endocrinology, and rheumatology, the majority answered that they did not feel the necessity of dental referrals; in orthopedics, it was difficult to earn patient cooperation due to financial, time, and motivational issues; and in oncology, they thought that the treatment of systemic disease was more urgent than dental treatment.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aimed to investigate medical doctors&rsquo; awareness of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and the status of dental referrals.

Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to medical doctors practicing internal medicine, family medicine, and orthopedics at the 6 tertiary medical centers located in Seoul, Korea. The survey consisted of 22 questions regarding the general characteristics, bisphosphonate therapy, awareness of BRONJ, and implementation of dental referrals.

Results: Among 192 medical doctors, 21.9&nbsp;% had not heard of the disease. Only 8.9&nbsp;% correctly answered all 5 questions testing BRONJ knowledge. Dental referrals made by medical doctors were implemented in less than 30&nbsp;% of the total patients. Oncology specialists most often recognized the necessity of dental referrals followed in decreasing order by endocrinology, rheumatology, family medicine, and orthopedic specialists.

Conclusion: Given medical doctors&rsquo; low BRONJ perception and implementation level of dental referrals, enhancing information dissemination on BRONJ and development of a highly accessible educational program recognizing the need for dental referrals are urgent.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12903-016-0290-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.