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Bilateral nasolabial cysts: a case report

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ABSTRACT

Background: Nasoalveolar cysts are rare non-odontogenic cysts that occur beneath the nasal alar region. Few cases of bilateral nasoalveolar cysts have been described.

Case presentation: We report a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with bilateral nasoalveolar cysts who presented to our department with the chief complaint of a swollen left nasal alar base. Panoramic radiography revealed no abnormalities. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-circumscribed oval lesion at both alar bases. Therefore, bilateral nasoalveolar cysts were clinically diagnosed. Furthermore, these cysts were extirpated under general anesthesia; the aforementioned diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed. No recurrence has been observed 1 year after surgery.

Conclusions: Nasoalveolar cysts are rare. It is necessary to be careful because nasoalveolar cysts can show bilateral occurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Magnetic resonance images obtained just before surgery. a. T1-weighted image. Oval lesions with high internal signal intensity inferior to the bilateral alar base. b. T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery image showing low signal intensity
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Fig4: Magnetic resonance images obtained just before surgery. a. T1-weighted image. Oval lesions with high internal signal intensity inferior to the bilateral alar base. b. T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery image showing low signal intensity

Mentions: Because she declined further evaluation and treatment, a wait-and-see approach was adopted. Although an increase in the swelling was noted in 2005, it remained untreated. Because of the recurrence and further aggravation of the swelling, she finally requested surgical removal of the lesion on 19 January 2010. On 7 May 2010, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cyst-like lesion, measuring approximately 25 mm in maximum diameter, at her left nasal alar base and another cyst-like lesion, measuring approximately 12 mm in maximum diameter, at her right nasal alar base. Both lesions showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery images (Fig. 4a, b). On the basis of a clinical diagnosis of bilateral nasoalveolar cysts, the cysts were extirpated under general anesthesia on 19 May 2010. The cysts adhered relatively strongly to the mucosa of her nasal cavity floor and the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle. No maxillary reabsorption was observed on either side. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and no recurrence was observed 1 year after surgery.Fig. 4


Bilateral nasolabial cysts: a case report
Magnetic resonance images obtained just before surgery. a. T1-weighted image. Oval lesions with high internal signal intensity inferior to the bilateral alar base. b. T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery image showing low signal intensity
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015322&req=5

Fig4: Magnetic resonance images obtained just before surgery. a. T1-weighted image. Oval lesions with high internal signal intensity inferior to the bilateral alar base. b. T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery image showing low signal intensity
Mentions: Because she declined further evaluation and treatment, a wait-and-see approach was adopted. Although an increase in the swelling was noted in 2005, it remained untreated. Because of the recurrence and further aggravation of the swelling, she finally requested surgical removal of the lesion on 19 January 2010. On 7 May 2010, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cyst-like lesion, measuring approximately 25 mm in maximum diameter, at her left nasal alar base and another cyst-like lesion, measuring approximately 12 mm in maximum diameter, at her right nasal alar base. Both lesions showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2-weighted short inversion time inversion recovery images (Fig. 4a, b). On the basis of a clinical diagnosis of bilateral nasoalveolar cysts, the cysts were extirpated under general anesthesia on 19 May 2010. The cysts adhered relatively strongly to the mucosa of her nasal cavity floor and the levator labii superioris alaeque nasi muscle. No maxillary reabsorption was observed on either side. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and no recurrence was observed 1 year after surgery.Fig. 4

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Nasoalveolar cysts are rare non-odontogenic cysts that occur beneath the nasal alar region. Few cases of bilateral nasoalveolar cysts have been described.

Case presentation: We report a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with bilateral nasoalveolar cysts who presented to our department with the chief complaint of a swollen left nasal alar base. Panoramic radiography revealed no abnormalities. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-circumscribed oval lesion at both alar bases. Therefore, bilateral nasoalveolar cysts were clinically diagnosed. Furthermore, these cysts were extirpated under general anesthesia; the aforementioned diagnosis was histopathologically confirmed. No recurrence has been observed 1 year after surgery.

Conclusions: Nasoalveolar cysts are rare. It is necessary to be careful because nasoalveolar cysts can show bilateral occurrence.

No MeSH data available.