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A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular.

No MeSH data available.


Comparison of deep desulphurization results using commercial diesel; (a) commercial diesel; (b) comparison with other organics.
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f7: Comparison of deep desulphurization results using commercial diesel; (a) commercial diesel; (b) comparison with other organics.

Mentions: It is instructive to evaluate the impact of nature of solvent from commercial application point of view for deep desulphurization of fuels. For this purpose, a commercial diesel was tested for the removal of sulphur (thiophene) similar to that discussed in the study. The commercial diesel had initial sulphur content of 30 ppm (probably in the form of refractory sulphur compounds). A known amount of sulphur using thiophene was added in this diesel and the effect of cavitation process was studied for pressure drop and for the extent of sulphur removal. The results of sulphur removal (thiophene in diesel) for the two different pressure drop conditions and using an intermediate organic to aqueous ratio (Organic phase, 6.5%) are shown in Fig. 7 along with a comparison with other organic solvents (Fig. 7). The results indicate a very high removal of sulphur even from the commercial diesel which is a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Similar to that observed in certain cases earlier, here, the removal was better at higher pressure drop condition of 2 bar as compared to 0.5 bar. The results clearly demonstrate that proposed method is successful in removing sulphur from commercial diesel.


A Non-catalytic Deep Desulphurization Process using Hydrodynamic Cavitation
Comparison of deep desulphurization results using commercial diesel; (a) commercial diesel; (b) comparison with other organics.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015108&req=5

f7: Comparison of deep desulphurization results using commercial diesel; (a) commercial diesel; (b) comparison with other organics.
Mentions: It is instructive to evaluate the impact of nature of solvent from commercial application point of view for deep desulphurization of fuels. For this purpose, a commercial diesel was tested for the removal of sulphur (thiophene) similar to that discussed in the study. The commercial diesel had initial sulphur content of 30 ppm (probably in the form of refractory sulphur compounds). A known amount of sulphur using thiophene was added in this diesel and the effect of cavitation process was studied for pressure drop and for the extent of sulphur removal. The results of sulphur removal (thiophene in diesel) for the two different pressure drop conditions and using an intermediate organic to aqueous ratio (Organic phase, 6.5%) are shown in Fig. 7 along with a comparison with other organic solvents (Fig. 7). The results indicate a very high removal of sulphur even from the commercial diesel which is a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Similar to that observed in certain cases earlier, here, the removal was better at higher pressure drop condition of 2 bar as compared to 0.5 bar. The results clearly demonstrate that proposed method is successful in removing sulphur from commercial diesel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A novel approach is developed for desulphurization of fuels or organics without use of catalyst. In this process, organic and aqueous phases are mixed in a predefined manner under ambient conditions and passed through a cavitating device. Vapor cavities formed in the cavitating device are then collapsed which generate (in-situ) oxidizing species which react with the sulphur moiety resulting in the removal of sulphur from the organic phase. In this work, vortex diode was used as a cavitating device. Three organic solvents (n-octane, toluene and n-octanol) containing known amount of a model sulphur compound (thiophene) up to initial concentrations of 500 ppm were used to verify the proposed method. A very high removal of sulphur content to the extent of 100% was demonstrated. The nature of organic phase and the ratio of aqueous to organic phase were found to be the most important process parameters. The results were also verified and substantiated using commercial diesel as a solvent. The developed process has great potential for deep of various organics, in general, and for transportation fuels, in particular.

No MeSH data available.