Limits...
Diversity of bacterial dimethylsulfoniopropionate degradation genes in surface seawater of Arctic Kongsfjorden

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is the major source of organic sulfur in the world’s oceans, plays a significant role in the global sulfur cycle. This compound is rapidly degraded by marine bacteria either by cleavage to dimethylsulfide (DMS) or demethylation to 3-methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The diversity of genes encoding bacterial demethylation (dmdA) and DMS production (dddL and dddP) were measured in Arctic Kongsfjorden. Both dmdA and dddL genes were detected in all stations along a transect from the outer to the inner fjord, while dddP gene was only found in the outer and middle parts of the fjord. The dmdA gene was completely confined to the Roseobacter clade, while the dddL gene was confined to the genus Sulfitobacter. Although the dddP gene pool was also dominated by homologs from the Roseobacter clade, there were a few dddP genes showing close relationships to both Alphaproteobacter and Gammaproteobacter. The results of this study suggest that the Roseobacter clade may play an important role in DMSP catabolism via both demethylation and cleavage pathways in surface waters of Kongsfjorden during summer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maps of sampling sites in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.The left image was created using CorelDRAW 8 software, and the right image was created using Ocean Data View 4.1.3 (https://odv.awi.de/).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015088&req=5

f1: Maps of sampling sites in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.The left image was created using CorelDRAW 8 software, and the right image was created using Ocean Data View 4.1.3 (https://odv.awi.de/).

Mentions: Kongsfjorden is a glacial fjord in the Arctic situated on the western side of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago that is influenced by the inflow of transformed Atlantic water as well as by meltwater of glacial origin (Fig. 1)24. In early summer in a post-spring bloom environment, DMSP, DMS, and chlorophyll a concentrations in water are 10 nmol l−1, 1.5 nmol l−1 and 0.21 μg l−1, respectively25. To describe the distribution of DMSP degradation genes relative to surface water and identify the bacterial communities potentially associated with these genes, we collected seawater samples following transect from the outer to the inner part of Kongsfjorden and studied the diversity of dmdA, dddL and dddP genes using a clone library method.


Diversity of bacterial dimethylsulfoniopropionate degradation genes in surface seawater of Arctic Kongsfjorden
Maps of sampling sites in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.The left image was created using CorelDRAW 8 software, and the right image was created using Ocean Data View 4.1.3 (https://odv.awi.de/).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015088&req=5

f1: Maps of sampling sites in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard.The left image was created using CorelDRAW 8 software, and the right image was created using Ocean Data View 4.1.3 (https://odv.awi.de/).
Mentions: Kongsfjorden is a glacial fjord in the Arctic situated on the western side of Spitsbergen in the Svalbard archipelago that is influenced by the inflow of transformed Atlantic water as well as by meltwater of glacial origin (Fig. 1)24. In early summer in a post-spring bloom environment, DMSP, DMS, and chlorophyll a concentrations in water are 10 nmol l−1, 1.5 nmol l−1 and 0.21 μg l−1, respectively25. To describe the distribution of DMSP degradation genes relative to surface water and identify the bacterial communities potentially associated with these genes, we collected seawater samples following transect from the outer to the inner part of Kongsfjorden and studied the diversity of dmdA, dddL and dddP genes using a clone library method.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which is the major source of organic sulfur in the world’s oceans, plays a significant role in the global sulfur cycle. This compound is rapidly degraded by marine bacteria either by cleavage to dimethylsulfide (DMS) or demethylation to 3-methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The diversity of genes encoding bacterial demethylation (dmdA) and DMS production (dddL and dddP) were measured in Arctic Kongsfjorden. Both dmdA and dddL genes were detected in all stations along a transect from the outer to the inner fjord, while dddP gene was only found in the outer and middle parts of the fjord. The dmdA gene was completely confined to the Roseobacter clade, while the dddL gene was confined to the genus Sulfitobacter. Although the dddP gene pool was also dominated by homologs from the Roseobacter clade, there were a few dddP genes showing close relationships to both Alphaproteobacter and Gammaproteobacter. The results of this study suggest that the Roseobacter clade may play an important role in DMSP catabolism via both demethylation and cleavage pathways in surface waters of Kongsfjorden during summer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus