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3D Holographic Observatory for Long-term Monitoring of Complex Behaviors in Drosophila

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Drosophila is an excellent model organism towards understanding the cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration in humans. The effects of aging and other long-term dynamics on the behavior serve as important biomarkers in identifying such changes to the brain. In this regard, we are presenting a new imaging technique for lifetime monitoring of Drosophila in 3D at spatial and temporal resolutions capable of resolving the motion of limbs and wings using holographic principles. The developed system is capable of monitoring and extracting various behavioral parameters, such as ethograms and spatial distributions, from a group of flies simultaneously. This technique can image complicated leg and wing motions of flies at a resolution, which allows capturing specific landing responses from the same data set. Overall, this system provides a unique opportunity for high throughput screenings of behavioral changes in 3D over a long term in Drosophila.

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(a) A schematic of DIH imaging system with specific application to Drosophila. (b) DIH fly observatory setup with He-Ne laser, spatial filter, collimation lens, fly arena (marked by box) with environmental control chamber (with pipe connected to humidifier) and the CMOS camera. (c) Fly arena loaded with Drosophila and fly food in food trays on the right wall with 10 mm scale bar. Current system would allow simultaneous recording of control and experimental flies. (d) Camera view of the arena, an inset of a magnified holographic image of a fly marked on the front wall and a 2 mm scale bar.
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f1: (a) A schematic of DIH imaging system with specific application to Drosophila. (b) DIH fly observatory setup with He-Ne laser, spatial filter, collimation lens, fly arena (marked by box) with environmental control chamber (with pipe connected to humidifier) and the CMOS camera. (c) Fly arena loaded with Drosophila and fly food in food trays on the right wall with 10 mm scale bar. Current system would allow simultaneous recording of control and experimental flies. (d) Camera view of the arena, an inset of a magnified holographic image of a fly marked on the front wall and a 2 mm scale bar.

Mentions: Digital Inline Holography (DIH), primarily a microscopic imaging technique, has emerged as an effective and compact tool to obtain 3D information of objects with both high spatial resolution and extended depth of field, i.e. more than 3 orders higher than traditional microscopy, using a single camera14 (Supplementary Methods). A typical DIH setup (Fig. 1a) consists of a single-beam collimated light source illuminating the objects of interest and recording the interference patterns (i.e. hologram) of the scattered and unscattered portions of the beam. We can extract the information stored in a hologram through convolution with a diffraction kernel, numerically, into a 3D optical field. Furthermore, by applying appropriate segmentation algorithms we can segment the objects of interest. Combined with object tracking and high-speed imaging, DIH has been successfully applied in the study of 3D dynamics of microorganisms (e.g. zooplankton, flagellates, bacteria, and algae) in their natural environment15161718. In this paper, we propose a large field of view (FOV) imaging system based on DIH, which can be applied for long-term monitoring of fine behaviors in free-flying Drosophila.


3D Holographic Observatory for Long-term Monitoring of Complex Behaviors in Drosophila
(a) A schematic of DIH imaging system with specific application to Drosophila. (b) DIH fly observatory setup with He-Ne laser, spatial filter, collimation lens, fly arena (marked by box) with environmental control chamber (with pipe connected to humidifier) and the CMOS camera. (c) Fly arena loaded with Drosophila and fly food in food trays on the right wall with 10 mm scale bar. Current system would allow simultaneous recording of control and experimental flies. (d) Camera view of the arena, an inset of a magnified holographic image of a fly marked on the front wall and a 2 mm scale bar.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5015086&req=5

f1: (a) A schematic of DIH imaging system with specific application to Drosophila. (b) DIH fly observatory setup with He-Ne laser, spatial filter, collimation lens, fly arena (marked by box) with environmental control chamber (with pipe connected to humidifier) and the CMOS camera. (c) Fly arena loaded with Drosophila and fly food in food trays on the right wall with 10 mm scale bar. Current system would allow simultaneous recording of control and experimental flies. (d) Camera view of the arena, an inset of a magnified holographic image of a fly marked on the front wall and a 2 mm scale bar.
Mentions: Digital Inline Holography (DIH), primarily a microscopic imaging technique, has emerged as an effective and compact tool to obtain 3D information of objects with both high spatial resolution and extended depth of field, i.e. more than 3 orders higher than traditional microscopy, using a single camera14 (Supplementary Methods). A typical DIH setup (Fig. 1a) consists of a single-beam collimated light source illuminating the objects of interest and recording the interference patterns (i.e. hologram) of the scattered and unscattered portions of the beam. We can extract the information stored in a hologram through convolution with a diffraction kernel, numerically, into a 3D optical field. Furthermore, by applying appropriate segmentation algorithms we can segment the objects of interest. Combined with object tracking and high-speed imaging, DIH has been successfully applied in the study of 3D dynamics of microorganisms (e.g. zooplankton, flagellates, bacteria, and algae) in their natural environment15161718. In this paper, we propose a large field of view (FOV) imaging system based on DIH, which can be applied for long-term monitoring of fine behaviors in free-flying Drosophila.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Drosophila is an excellent model organism towards understanding the cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration in humans. The effects of aging and other long-term dynamics on the behavior serve as important biomarkers in identifying such changes to the brain. In this regard, we are presenting a new imaging technique for lifetime monitoring of Drosophila in 3D at spatial and temporal resolutions capable of resolving the motion of limbs and wings using holographic principles. The developed system is capable of monitoring and extracting various behavioral parameters, such as ethograms and spatial distributions, from a group of flies simultaneously. This technique can image complicated leg and wing motions of flies at a resolution, which allows capturing specific landing responses from the same data set. Overall, this system provides a unique opportunity for high throughput screenings of behavioral changes in 3D over a long term in Drosophila.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus