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Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.

We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.

Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Chest X-ray at 15 months postoperatively showing fully expanded lungs.
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Figure 3: Chest X-ray at 15 months postoperatively showing fully expanded lungs.

Mentions: Approximately 7 months later, the patient exhibited no further respiratory symptoms. She did not experience any interference in her normal daily activities from the HDP. The follow-up chest radiograph showed a mild improvement of the right lower lobe atelectasis. In the final follow-up, almost 15 months postoperatively, the chest radiograph had completely returned to the baseline (Fig. 3).


Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block
Chest X-ray at 15 months postoperatively showing fully expanded lungs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998470&req=5

Figure 3: Chest X-ray at 15 months postoperatively showing fully expanded lungs.
Mentions: Approximately 7 months later, the patient exhibited no further respiratory symptoms. She did not experience any interference in her normal daily activities from the HDP. The follow-up chest radiograph showed a mild improvement of the right lower lobe atelectasis. In the final follow-up, almost 15 months postoperatively, the chest radiograph had completely returned to the baseline (Fig. 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.

We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.

Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries.

No MeSH data available.