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Electroacupuncture for patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome or functional diarrhea

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and functional diarrhea (FD) are highly prevalent, and the effectiveness of acupuncture for managing IBS-D and FD is still unknown.

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture with loperamide.

It was a prospective, randomized, parallel group controlled trial.

A total of 448 participants were randomly assigned to He electroacupuncture group (n = 113), Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 111), He-Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 112), or loperamide group (n = 112). Participants in the 3 acupuncture groups received 16 sessions of electroacupuncture during a 4-week treatment phase, whereas participants in the loperamide group received oral loperamide 2 mg thrice daily. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in stool frequency at the end of the 4-weeks treatment. The secondary outcomes were the Bristol scale, the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the proportion of adverse events.

Stool frequency was significantly reduced at the end of the 4-week treatment in the 4 groups (mean change from baseline, 5.35 times/week). No significant difference was found between the 3 electroacupuncture groups and the loperamide group in the primary outcome (He vs. loperamide group [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4]; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3]; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8]). Both electroacupuncture and loperamide significantly improved the mean score of Bristol scale and increased the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the mean scores of SF-36; they were equivalent in these outcomes. However, the participants in electroacupuncture groups did not report fewer adverse events than those in the loperamide group. Similar results were found in a subgroup analysis of separating patients with IBS-D and FD patients.

Electroacupuncture is equivalent to loperamide for reducing stool frequency in IBS-D and FD patients. Further studies on cost effectiveness of acupuncture are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change from baseline in stool frequency. The mean change from baseline in stool frequency at week 4 is shown. The He, Shu-Mu, He-Shu-Mu, and loperamide groups were comparable in this outcome (P = 0.82). The red dots show the mean changes in stool frequency in the 4 groups, which were 5.66, 5.52, 5.11, and 5.11 times/week, respectively.
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Figure 3: Change from baseline in stool frequency. The mean change from baseline in stool frequency at week 4 is shown. The He, Shu-Mu, He-Shu-Mu, and loperamide groups were comparable in this outcome (P = 0.82). The red dots show the mean changes in stool frequency in the 4 groups, which were 5.66, 5.52, 5.11, and 5.11 times/week, respectively.

Mentions: The stool frequency reduced to 10.6 times/week at week 4 and slightly increased to 11.1 times/week at week 8. The change from baseline in stool frequency was 5.4 times/week at week 4 and 4.8 times/week at week 8. The change in stool frequency at week 4 was comparable between the 4 groups (P = 0.80), even after adjusted for baseline variables (P = 0.76). In pairwise comparisons, all the 3 electroacupuncture treatments were equivalent to loperamide (He vs. loperamide, [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4], P = 0.857; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide, [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3], P = 0.933; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8], P = 1.000). In an exploratory analysis, all the 3 electroacupuncture groups were comparable in pairwise comparisons (He vs. Shu-Mu [mean difference 0.1, 95% CI, –1.7 to 2.0], P = 0.997; He vs. He-Shu-Mu [0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4], P = 0.858; Shu-Mu vs. He-Shu-Mu [0.5, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3], P = 0.935). Figure 3 shows the details.


Electroacupuncture for patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome or functional diarrhea
Change from baseline in stool frequency. The mean change from baseline in stool frequency at week 4 is shown. The He, Shu-Mu, He-Shu-Mu, and loperamide groups were comparable in this outcome (P = 0.82). The red dots show the mean changes in stool frequency in the 4 groups, which were 5.66, 5.52, 5.11, and 5.11 times/week, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998466&req=5

Figure 3: Change from baseline in stool frequency. The mean change from baseline in stool frequency at week 4 is shown. The He, Shu-Mu, He-Shu-Mu, and loperamide groups were comparable in this outcome (P = 0.82). The red dots show the mean changes in stool frequency in the 4 groups, which were 5.66, 5.52, 5.11, and 5.11 times/week, respectively.
Mentions: The stool frequency reduced to 10.6 times/week at week 4 and slightly increased to 11.1 times/week at week 8. The change from baseline in stool frequency was 5.4 times/week at week 4 and 4.8 times/week at week 8. The change in stool frequency at week 4 was comparable between the 4 groups (P = 0.80), even after adjusted for baseline variables (P = 0.76). In pairwise comparisons, all the 3 electroacupuncture treatments were equivalent to loperamide (He vs. loperamide, [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4], P = 0.857; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide, [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3], P = 0.933; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8], P = 1.000). In an exploratory analysis, all the 3 electroacupuncture groups were comparable in pairwise comparisons (He vs. Shu-Mu [mean difference 0.1, 95% CI, –1.7 to 2.0], P = 0.997; He vs. He-Shu-Mu [0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4], P = 0.858; Shu-Mu vs. He-Shu-Mu [0.5, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3], P = 0.935). Figure 3 shows the details.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and functional diarrhea (FD) are highly prevalent, and the effectiveness of acupuncture for managing IBS-D and FD is still unknown.

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture with loperamide.

It was a prospective, randomized, parallel group controlled trial.

A total of 448 participants were randomly assigned to He electroacupuncture group (n = 113), Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 111), He-Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 112), or loperamide group (n = 112). Participants in the 3 acupuncture groups received 16 sessions of electroacupuncture during a 4-week treatment phase, whereas participants in the loperamide group received oral loperamide 2 mg thrice daily. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in stool frequency at the end of the 4-weeks treatment. The secondary outcomes were the Bristol scale, the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the proportion of adverse events.

Stool frequency was significantly reduced at the end of the 4-week treatment in the 4 groups (mean change from baseline, 5.35 times/week). No significant difference was found between the 3 electroacupuncture groups and the loperamide group in the primary outcome (He vs. loperamide group [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4]; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3]; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8]). Both electroacupuncture and loperamide significantly improved the mean score of Bristol scale and increased the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the mean scores of SF-36; they were equivalent in these outcomes. However, the participants in electroacupuncture groups did not report fewer adverse events than those in the loperamide group. Similar results were found in a subgroup analysis of separating patients with IBS-D and FD patients.

Electroacupuncture is equivalent to loperamide for reducing stool frequency in IBS-D and FD patients. Further studies on cost effectiveness of acupuncture are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus