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Ten-year Diabetes Risk Forecast in the Capital of Jordan

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of diabetes in Jordan has been increasing. The early diagnosis of diabetes is vital to slow its progression. The Arab Risk (ARABRISK) screening tool is a self-administered questionnaire used to determine people who are at high risk for developing diabetes. This study aimed to identify people at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes by using the ARABRISK in the capital of Jordan.

A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of people in the capital of Jordan. The ARABRISK screening tool was administered to identify the participants’ risk for developing diabetes. In addition to descriptive statistics, percentages of the ARABRISK categories were represented, and an independent samples t test was used to explore the differences between men and women. A total of 513 participants with a mean age of 51.94 (SD = 10.33) were recruited; 64.9% of the participants were men (n = 333).

The total ARABRISK score ranged from 0 to 25 with a mean score of 12.30 (SD = 4.76). Using the independent samples t test, women (mean = 13.25, SE = 0.10) had significantly higher ARABRISK total scores than men did (mean = 12.95, SE = 0.09), t(141) = −2.23, P = 0.03 in the “moderate risk” category. All of the items in the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors as indicated by the standardized regression coefficient (β). Older age, obesity, elevated weight circumference, absence of daily physical activity, daily consumption of fruits/vegetables, presence of high blood pressure (HBP), and HBG were significantly associated with increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores. Neither a history of gestational diabetes nor a positive family history was associated with an increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores.

By identifying risk factors in these participants, interventions and lifestyle changes can be suggested and implemented to reduce the risk and incidence of diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regression plot of standardized residuals vs standardized predicted values (dependent variable, ARABRISK total score).
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Figure 1: Regression plot of standardized residuals vs standardized predicted values (dependent variable, ARABRISK total score).

Mentions: Table 4 details the best model of regression analysis. The value of R2 in this model was 0.99 or 99% of the variance in ARABRISK total scores. All of the items on the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors, as indicated by the standardized regression coefficients values (β). These predictors were positively associated with the ARABRISK total scores. The shared and unique contributions of the predictors age, BMI, and HBG predictors were 99% (each) and 19.8%, 14.4%, 21.9%, respectively, as indicated by the partial correlations in Table 4. The regression plot of standardized residuals versus standardized predicted values indicates that the points are randomly and evenly dispersed throughout the plot, as shown in Figure 1.


Ten-year Diabetes Risk Forecast in the Capital of Jordan
Regression plot of standardized residuals vs standardized predicted values (dependent variable, ARABRISK total score).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998404&req=5

Figure 1: Regression plot of standardized residuals vs standardized predicted values (dependent variable, ARABRISK total score).
Mentions: Table 4 details the best model of regression analysis. The value of R2 in this model was 0.99 or 99% of the variance in ARABRISK total scores. All of the items on the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors, as indicated by the standardized regression coefficients values (β). These predictors were positively associated with the ARABRISK total scores. The shared and unique contributions of the predictors age, BMI, and HBG predictors were 99% (each) and 19.8%, 14.4%, 21.9%, respectively, as indicated by the partial correlations in Table 4. The regression plot of standardized residuals versus standardized predicted values indicates that the points are randomly and evenly dispersed throughout the plot, as shown in Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of diabetes in Jordan has been increasing. The early diagnosis of diabetes is vital to slow its progression. The Arab Risk (ARABRISK) screening tool is a self-administered questionnaire used to determine people who are at high risk for developing diabetes. This study aimed to identify people at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes by using the ARABRISK in the capital of Jordan.

A cross-sectional study was conducted with a convenience sample of people in the capital of Jordan. The ARABRISK screening tool was administered to identify the participants’ risk for developing diabetes. In addition to descriptive statistics, percentages of the ARABRISK categories were represented, and an independent samples t test was used to explore the differences between men and women. A total of 513 participants with a mean age of 51.94 (SD = 10.33) were recruited; 64.9% of the participants were men (n = 333).

The total ARABRISK score ranged from 0 to 25 with a mean score of 12.30 (SD = 4.76). Using the independent samples t test, women (mean = 13.25, SE = 0.10) had significantly higher ARABRISK total scores than men did (mean = 12.95, SE = 0.09), t(141) = −2.23, P = 0.03 in the “moderate risk” category. All of the items in the ARABRISK questionnaire were found to be good predictors of the ARABRISK total scores. Among them, age, body mass index (BMI), and high blood glucose (HBG) were the best predictors as indicated by the standardized regression coefficient (β). Older age, obesity, elevated weight circumference, absence of daily physical activity, daily consumption of fruits/vegetables, presence of high blood pressure (HBP), and HBG were significantly associated with increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores. Neither a history of gestational diabetes nor a positive family history was associated with an increased odds of high ARABRISK total scores.

By identifying risk factors in these participants, interventions and lifestyle changes can be suggested and implemented to reduce the risk and incidence of diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus