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Comparison of Adductor Canal Block and Femoral Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Knee Arthroplasty

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate-to-severe pain. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after TKA.

Relevant literatures about the ACB and FNB after TKA for reducing pain were searched from Medline (1996-January, 2015), Embase (1980-January, 2015), PubMed (1980-January, 2015), Web of Science (1980-January, 2015), and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. High-quality RCTs and non-RCTs were picked to evaluate the visual analogue scale (VAS) and other outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the PRISMA statement criteria. The software RevMan 5.30 was used for the meta-analysis.

Eight literatures fitted into the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences in VAS score with rest or mobilization at 4, 24, and 48 h between ACB group and FNB group. There were also no significant differences in the strength of quadriceps and adductor, the length of hospital stay, and complications of vomiting and nausea.

Present meta-analysis indicated that ACB shows no superiority than FNB group. Both of them can reduce the pain score after TKA. As referred to which method to adopt, it is determined by the preference of the surgeons and anesthesiologists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot diagram showing maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) groups.
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Figure 13: Forest plot diagram showing maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) groups.

Mentions: Two studies with 97 TKAs reported the MVIC of quadriceps postoperatively. Meta-analysis revealed that the 2 groups have no significant difference (Figure 13) (MD = 96.27; 95% CI −42.69 to 235.24; P = 0.17).


Comparison of Adductor Canal Block and Femoral Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain in Total Knee Arthroplasty
Forest plot diagram showing maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998367&req=5

Figure 13: Forest plot diagram showing maximum voluntary isometric contraction of quadriceps of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) groups.
Mentions: Two studies with 97 TKAs reported the MVIC of quadriceps postoperatively. Meta-analysis revealed that the 2 groups have no significant difference (Figure 13) (MD = 96.27; 95% CI −42.69 to 235.24; P = 0.17).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has always been associated with moderate-to-severe pain. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pain control of adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after TKA.

Relevant literatures about the ACB and FNB after TKA for reducing pain were searched from Medline (1996-January, 2015), Embase (1980-January, 2015), PubMed (1980-January, 2015), Web of Science (1980-January, 2015), and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. High-quality RCTs and non-RCTs were picked to evaluate the visual analogue scale (VAS) and other outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed according to the PRISMA statement criteria. The software RevMan 5.30 was used for the meta-analysis.

Eight literatures fitted into the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences in VAS score with rest or mobilization at 4, 24, and 48 h between ACB group and FNB group. There were also no significant differences in the strength of quadriceps and adductor, the length of hospital stay, and complications of vomiting and nausea.

Present meta-analysis indicated that ACB shows no superiority than FNB group. Both of them can reduce the pain score after TKA. As referred to which method to adopt, it is determined by the preference of the surgeons and anesthesiologists.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus