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Perirhinal cortex lesions that impair object recognition memory spare landmark discriminations

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Loss of perirhinal cortex spares mirror-imaged landmark discriminations.

Perirhinal cortex lesions do not disrupt latent spatial learning.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

No MeSH data available.


Passive learning of a corner location in the square water-maze. Each graph shows the proportion of time spent in the trained (‘Correct’) corner of the maze. One corner was the mirror-image of the training corner (‘Incorrect’). 13. In Probes 1 and 3 the maze contained three white walls and one striped wall. In Probes 2 and 4 the maze contained two adjacent white walls and two adjacent striped walls. Probes 1 and 2 followed ‘passive’ training while Probes 3 and 4 followed ‘active’ training.
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fig0015: Passive learning of a corner location in the square water-maze. Each graph shows the proportion of time spent in the trained (‘Correct’) corner of the maze. One corner was the mirror-image of the training corner (‘Incorrect’). 13. In Probes 1 and 3 the maze contained three white walls and one striped wall. In Probes 2 and 4 the maze contained two adjacent white walls and two adjacent striped walls. Probes 1 and 2 followed ‘passive’ training while Probes 3 and 4 followed ‘active’ training.

Mentions: The rats were placed on the platform for eight days (four trials a day). The platform was positioned 25 cm from a corner on an imaginary line that bisected the corner. This position was counterbalanced, so that half of the rats had the platform placed in a corner where the striped wall was to the right of a white wall. For the other half, the platform was in the corner where the striped wall was to the left of the white wall. To ify any extraneous cues and ensure that the task could only be solved by discriminating between the mirror-imaged landmarks, the square pool was randomly rotated 90°, 180°, or 270° clockwise between each trial. Rats were placed individually on the escape platform for 30 s on four separate trials (inter-trial interval approximately four minutes). On day eight, the rats received three training trials followed by a test trial (Probe 1, ‘One striped wall’). For Probe 1, the platform was removed, the rats placed in the centre of the square pool, and allowed 60 s to swim in the water for the first time. The latencies to reach the escape location did not differ between the two groups (t < 1; means, Perirhinal = 20.9s, Sham = 24.7 s). There were no group difference when the times in the correct corner (t < 1), incorrect corner (t < 1), or white:white corner (t26 = 1,17, P = 0.099) were separately compared between the two groups (Fig. 3).


Perirhinal cortex lesions that impair object recognition memory spare landmark discriminations
Passive learning of a corner location in the square water-maze. Each graph shows the proportion of time spent in the trained (‘Correct’) corner of the maze. One corner was the mirror-image of the training corner (‘Incorrect’). 13. In Probes 1 and 3 the maze contained three white walls and one striped wall. In Probes 2 and 4 the maze contained two adjacent white walls and two adjacent striped walls. Probes 1 and 2 followed ‘passive’ training while Probes 3 and 4 followed ‘active’ training.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig0015: Passive learning of a corner location in the square water-maze. Each graph shows the proportion of time spent in the trained (‘Correct’) corner of the maze. One corner was the mirror-image of the training corner (‘Incorrect’). 13. In Probes 1 and 3 the maze contained three white walls and one striped wall. In Probes 2 and 4 the maze contained two adjacent white walls and two adjacent striped walls. Probes 1 and 2 followed ‘passive’ training while Probes 3 and 4 followed ‘active’ training.
Mentions: The rats were placed on the platform for eight days (four trials a day). The platform was positioned 25 cm from a corner on an imaginary line that bisected the corner. This position was counterbalanced, so that half of the rats had the platform placed in a corner where the striped wall was to the right of a white wall. For the other half, the platform was in the corner where the striped wall was to the left of the white wall. To ify any extraneous cues and ensure that the task could only be solved by discriminating between the mirror-imaged landmarks, the square pool was randomly rotated 90°, 180°, or 270° clockwise between each trial. Rats were placed individually on the escape platform for 30 s on four separate trials (inter-trial interval approximately four minutes). On day eight, the rats received three training trials followed by a test trial (Probe 1, ‘One striped wall’). For Probe 1, the platform was removed, the rats placed in the centre of the square pool, and allowed 60 s to swim in the water for the first time. The latencies to reach the escape location did not differ between the two groups (t < 1; means, Perirhinal = 20.9s, Sham = 24.7 s). There were no group difference when the times in the correct corner (t < 1), incorrect corner (t < 1), or white:white corner (t26 = 1,17, P = 0.099) were separately compared between the two groups (Fig. 3).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Loss of perirhinal cortex spares mirror-imaged landmark discriminations.

Perirhinal cortex lesions do not disrupt latent spatial learning.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

No MeSH data available.