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Perirhinal cortex lesions that impair object recognition memory spare landmark discriminations

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Loss of perirhinal cortex spares mirror-imaged landmark discriminations.

Perirhinal cortex lesions do not disrupt latent spatial learning.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

No MeSH data available.


Diagrammatic reconstructions of the perirhinal cortex lesions, showing the individual cases with the largest (grey) and smallest (black) lesions. The most rostral coronal section is at the top. The sections are ∼1 mm apart in the AP plane.
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fig0010: Diagrammatic reconstructions of the perirhinal cortex lesions, showing the individual cases with the largest (grey) and smallest (black) lesions. The most rostral coronal section is at the top. The sections are ∼1 mm apart in the AP plane.

Mentions: The lesions, consistently centred on the rhinal sulcus, caused extensive bilateral damage to areas 35 and 36 (Fig. 2). One case was rejected because of bilateral sparing, leaving 16 perirhinal and 12 sham animals. The lesions involved almost the full anterior-posterior extent of areas 35 and 36. The mean percentage of perirhinal cortex loss was 76.0% (range 53.7–95.0%). A frequent feature was some cell loss in the adjacent part of the piriform cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex. There was often limited damage to that part of CA1 immediately adjacent of the fundus of the rhinal sulcus (7 unilateral, 7 bilateral) but was typically very restricted to the level of the most caudal rhinal sulcus.


Perirhinal cortex lesions that impair object recognition memory spare landmark discriminations
Diagrammatic reconstructions of the perirhinal cortex lesions, showing the individual cases with the largest (grey) and smallest (black) lesions. The most rostral coronal section is at the top. The sections are ∼1 mm apart in the AP plane.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998350&req=5

fig0010: Diagrammatic reconstructions of the perirhinal cortex lesions, showing the individual cases with the largest (grey) and smallest (black) lesions. The most rostral coronal section is at the top. The sections are ∼1 mm apart in the AP plane.
Mentions: The lesions, consistently centred on the rhinal sulcus, caused extensive bilateral damage to areas 35 and 36 (Fig. 2). One case was rejected because of bilateral sparing, leaving 16 perirhinal and 12 sham animals. The lesions involved almost the full anterior-posterior extent of areas 35 and 36. The mean percentage of perirhinal cortex loss was 76.0% (range 53.7–95.0%). A frequent feature was some cell loss in the adjacent part of the piriform cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex. There was often limited damage to that part of CA1 immediately adjacent of the fundus of the rhinal sulcus (7 unilateral, 7 bilateral) but was typically very restricted to the level of the most caudal rhinal sulcus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Loss of perirhinal cortex spares mirror-imaged landmark discriminations.

Perirhinal cortex lesions do not disrupt latent spatial learning.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

Further underlines dissociation between perirhinal and hippocampal function.

No MeSH data available.