Limits...
Pneumoconiosis increases the risk of congestive heart failure

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between pneumoconiosis and congestive heart failure (CHF).

We collected data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The study sample comprised 8923 patients with pneumoconiosis and 35,692 nonpneumoconiosis controls enrolled from 2000 to 2011. Patients were followed up until the end of 2011 to evaluate the incidence of CHF. The risk of CHF was analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression models, and the analysis accounted for factors such as sex, age, comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3).

The overall incidence of CHF was higher in the pneumoconiosis cohort (15.7 per 1000 person-y) than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (11.2 per 1000 person-y), with a crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.40 (P < 0.001). The HR for CHF was 1.38-fold greater in the pneumoconiosis cohort than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (P < 0.001) after the model was adjusted for age, sex, various comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3). The relative risk for CHF in the sex-specific pneumoconiosis cohort compared with the nonpneumoconiosis cohort was significant for men (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.21–1.62, P < 0.001). The incidence density rates of CHF increased with age; pneumoconiosis patients had a higher relative risk of CHF for all age group.

Patients with pneumoconiosis were at higher risk for developing CHF than patients in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort, particularly in cases with coexisting coronary artery disease, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The results of multivariable Cox proportion hazards regression models for the risk of pneumoconiosis and comorbidity contributing to congestive heart failure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998335&req=5

Figure 2: The results of multivariable Cox proportion hazards regression models for the risk of pneumoconiosis and comorbidity contributing to congestive heart failure.

Mentions: After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, CAD, stroke, and COPD), PM2.5 yearly average, and PM10 yearly average, the pneumoconiosis patients had a 1.38-fold greater risk of CHF (95% CI = 1.21–1.58) than the nonpneumoconiosis patients. The sex-specific incidence rate of CHF was slightly higher for the women in both cohorts. The relative risk of CHF in the sex-specific pneumoconiosis cohort compared with the nonpneumoconiosis cohort was significant for men (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.21–1.62). When stratified by age, the incidence density rates of CHF increased with age in both cohorts, and pneumoconiosis patients had a higher relative risk of CHF for all age group than patients without pneumoconiosis. We analyzed the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of CHF by stratifying the comorbidities, and found a similar increased level of risk for CHF in patients with no comorbidity (adjusted HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03–1.86) and those with comorbidities (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.06–1.40). Table 3 shows the results of univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models for the association between pneumoconiosis and CHF. The risk of developing CHF increased 1.05-fold (95% CI = 1.04–1.06) with age (per year), and the risk was higher for patients with hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.47–1.86), CAD (adjusted HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.47–1.86), COPD (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.02–1.33), and increasing 1.00-fold (95% CI = 1.00–1.01) with PM2.5 yearly average (μg/m3). Figure 2 depicts the joint effect of pneumoconiosis and hypertension or CAD or COPD on CHF risk. A higher risk of CHF was observed in patients with pneumoconiosis and hypertension (adjusted HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 2.34–3.31), pneumoconiosis and CAD (adjusted HR = 3.00, 95% CI = 2.43–3.70), or pneumoconiosis and COPD (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.42–1.94) than patients without pneumoconiosis, hypertension, CAD, or COPD.


Pneumoconiosis increases the risk of congestive heart failure
The results of multivariable Cox proportion hazards regression models for the risk of pneumoconiosis and comorbidity contributing to congestive heart failure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998335&req=5

Figure 2: The results of multivariable Cox proportion hazards regression models for the risk of pneumoconiosis and comorbidity contributing to congestive heart failure.
Mentions: After adjustment for age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, CAD, stroke, and COPD), PM2.5 yearly average, and PM10 yearly average, the pneumoconiosis patients had a 1.38-fold greater risk of CHF (95% CI = 1.21–1.58) than the nonpneumoconiosis patients. The sex-specific incidence rate of CHF was slightly higher for the women in both cohorts. The relative risk of CHF in the sex-specific pneumoconiosis cohort compared with the nonpneumoconiosis cohort was significant for men (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.21–1.62). When stratified by age, the incidence density rates of CHF increased with age in both cohorts, and pneumoconiosis patients had a higher relative risk of CHF for all age group than patients without pneumoconiosis. We analyzed the association between pneumoconiosis and the risk of CHF by stratifying the comorbidities, and found a similar increased level of risk for CHF in patients with no comorbidity (adjusted HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03–1.86) and those with comorbidities (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.06–1.40). Table 3 shows the results of univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models for the association between pneumoconiosis and CHF. The risk of developing CHF increased 1.05-fold (95% CI = 1.04–1.06) with age (per year), and the risk was higher for patients with hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.47–1.86), CAD (adjusted HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.47–1.86), COPD (adjusted HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.02–1.33), and increasing 1.00-fold (95% CI = 1.00–1.01) with PM2.5 yearly average (μg/m3). Figure 2 depicts the joint effect of pneumoconiosis and hypertension or CAD or COPD on CHF risk. A higher risk of CHF was observed in patients with pneumoconiosis and hypertension (adjusted HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 2.34–3.31), pneumoconiosis and CAD (adjusted HR = 3.00, 95% CI = 2.43–3.70), or pneumoconiosis and COPD (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.42–1.94) than patients without pneumoconiosis, hypertension, CAD, or COPD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between pneumoconiosis and congestive heart failure (CHF).

We collected data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The study sample comprised 8923 patients with pneumoconiosis and 35,692 nonpneumoconiosis controls enrolled from 2000 to 2011. Patients were followed up until the end of 2011 to evaluate the incidence of CHF. The risk of CHF was analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regression models, and the analysis accounted for factors such as sex, age, comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3).

The overall incidence of CHF was higher in the pneumoconiosis cohort (15.7 per 1000 person-y) than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (11.2 per 1000 person-y), with a crude hazard ratio (HR) of 1.40 (P < 0.001). The HR for CHF was 1.38-fold greater in the pneumoconiosis cohort than in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort (P < 0.001) after the model was adjusted for age, sex, various comorbidities, and air pollutants (μg/m3). The relative risk for CHF in the sex-specific pneumoconiosis cohort compared with the nonpneumoconiosis cohort was significant for men (adjusted HR = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.21–1.62, P < 0.001). The incidence density rates of CHF increased with age; pneumoconiosis patients had a higher relative risk of CHF for all age group.

Patients with pneumoconiosis were at higher risk for developing CHF than patients in the nonpneumoconiosis cohort, particularly in cases with coexisting coronary artery disease, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus