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Long-term cancer-related fatigue outcomes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and clinical parameters, and the effect factors of fatigue for the prostate cancer patients. Long-term follow-up is performed using the Fatigue Symptom Inventory before treatment (A), at the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (B), and 3 months (C), 12 months (D), 24 months (E), 36 months (F), and 48 months (G) after the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three dimensions of fatigue are assessed during follow-up: severity, perceived interference with quality of life, and duration in the past week. In all, 97 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Median follow-up time was 43.9 months. The fatigue index was significantly higher in the prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >8, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores, and the higher education. The most severe fatigue occurred at time points B and C. The score for duration of fatigue fluctuated across the time points, with significantly increased scores at time points D, E, and F.

In conclusion, we show that cancer-related fatigue is the important symptom which affects the quality of life for the prostate cancer patients. For patients with locally advanced prostate cancer with a high Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, a Gleason score of >8 points, prostate-specific antigen levels of >20 ng/mL, and high education, attention should be paid to the interference of fatigue with quality of life, especially general level of activity, ability to concentrate, and mood, after radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Diagram showing the study cohort according to received treatment. A = time A (base evaluate), B = time B (after radiation), C = time C (3 months), D = time D (12 months), E = time E (24 months), F = time F (42 months), G = time G (42 months).
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Figure 1: Diagram showing the study cohort according to received treatment. A = time A (base evaluate), B = time B (after radiation), C = time C (3 months), D = time D (12 months), E = time E (24 months), F = time F (42 months), G = time G (42 months).

Mentions: A total of 126 patients with prostate cancer met the inclusion criteria were admitted to the hospital. Of them, 97 (76.9%) agreed to participate in the long-term questionnaire follow-up. General information and IMRT-related data of patients enrolled are shown in Table 1. The median follow-up time was 43.9 months (range 14.5–72.6). All patients completed the treatment. The number of valid questionnaires at each time point are listed in Table 2, and are as follows: C (n = 95): 2 patients with bone metastasis; D (n = 86): 5 with biochemical recurrence, 2 lost to follow-up, and 2 deaths; E (n = 74): 3 with biochemical recurrence, 6 lost to follow-up, 1 death, and 2 with distal metastasis; F (n = 63): 2 with biochemical recurrence, 4 lost to follow-up, and 5 deaths; G (n = 61): 1 lost to follow-up, and 1 with bone metastasis (Fig. 1).


Long-term cancer-related fatigue outcomes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy
Diagram showing the study cohort according to received treatment. A = time A (base evaluate), B = time B (after radiation), C = time C (3 months), D = time D (12 months), E = time E (24 months), F = time F (42 months), G = time G (42 months).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998328&req=5

Figure 1: Diagram showing the study cohort according to received treatment. A = time A (base evaluate), B = time B (after radiation), C = time C (3 months), D = time D (12 months), E = time E (24 months), F = time F (42 months), G = time G (42 months).
Mentions: A total of 126 patients with prostate cancer met the inclusion criteria were admitted to the hospital. Of them, 97 (76.9%) agreed to participate in the long-term questionnaire follow-up. General information and IMRT-related data of patients enrolled are shown in Table 1. The median follow-up time was 43.9 months (range 14.5–72.6). All patients completed the treatment. The number of valid questionnaires at each time point are listed in Table 2, and are as follows: C (n = 95): 2 patients with bone metastasis; D (n = 86): 5 with biochemical recurrence, 2 lost to follow-up, and 2 deaths; E (n = 74): 3 with biochemical recurrence, 6 lost to follow-up, 1 death, and 2 with distal metastasis; F (n = 63): 2 with biochemical recurrence, 4 lost to follow-up, and 5 deaths; G (n = 61): 1 lost to follow-up, and 1 with bone metastasis (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and clinical parameters, and the effect factors of fatigue for the prostate cancer patients. Long-term follow-up is performed using the Fatigue Symptom Inventory before treatment (A), at the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (B), and 3 months (C), 12 months (D), 24 months (E), 36 months (F), and 48 months (G) after the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three dimensions of fatigue are assessed during follow-up: severity, perceived interference with quality of life, and duration in the past week. In all, 97 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Median follow-up time was 43.9 months. The fatigue index was significantly higher in the prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >8, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores, and the higher education. The most severe fatigue occurred at time points B and C. The score for duration of fatigue fluctuated across the time points, with significantly increased scores at time points D, E, and F.

In conclusion, we show that cancer-related fatigue is the important symptom which affects the quality of life for the prostate cancer patients. For patients with locally advanced prostate cancer with a high Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, a Gleason score of >8 points, prostate-specific antigen levels of >20 ng/mL, and high education, attention should be paid to the interference of fatigue with quality of life, especially general level of activity, ability to concentrate, and mood, after radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy.

No MeSH data available.