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The role of age and comorbidities in postoperative outcome of mitral valve repair

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ABSTRACT

The average age of patients undergoing mitral valve repair is increasing each year. This retrospective study aimed to compare postoperative complications of mitral valve repair (known to be especially high-risk) between 2 age groups: under and over the age of 80.

Patients who underwent mitral valve repair were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (<80 years old) and group 2 (≥80 years old). Baseline characteristics, pre- and postoperative hemodynamic data, surgical characteristics, and postoperative follow-up data until hospital discharge were collected.

A total of 308 patients were included: 264 in group 1 (age 63 ± 13 years) and 44 in group 2 (age 83 ± 2 years). Older patients had more comorbidities (atrial fibrillation, history of cardiac decompensation, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic kidney disease) and they presented more postoperative complications (50.0% vs 33.7%; P = 0.043), with a longer hospital stay (8.9 ± 6.9 vs 6.6 ± 4.6 days; P = 0.005). To assess the burden of age, a propensity score was awarded to postoperative complications. Active smoking, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, associated ischemic heart disease, obesity, and cardio pulmonary by-pass duration were described as independent risk factors. When matched on this propensity score, there was no difference in morbidity or mortality between group 1 and group 2.

Older patients suffered more postoperative complications, which were related to their comorbidities and not only to their age.

No MeSH data available.


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Mortality according to the number of postoperative complications.
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Figure 1: Mortality according to the number of postoperative complications.

Mentions: Postoperative complications are associated with higher in-hospital[11] and long-term mortality[12] as well as longer hospitalizations.[13] A preliminary assessment[11] showed that mortality was statistically higher for patients presenting more than one complication (Fig. 1).


The role of age and comorbidities in postoperative outcome of mitral valve repair
Mortality according to the number of postoperative complications.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998324&req=5

Figure 1: Mortality according to the number of postoperative complications.
Mentions: Postoperative complications are associated with higher in-hospital[11] and long-term mortality[12] as well as longer hospitalizations.[13] A preliminary assessment[11] showed that mortality was statistically higher for patients presenting more than one complication (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The average age of patients undergoing mitral valve repair is increasing each year. This retrospective study aimed to compare postoperative complications of mitral valve repair (known to be especially high-risk) between 2 age groups: under and over the age of 80.

Patients who underwent mitral valve repair were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (<80 years old) and group 2 (≥80 years old). Baseline characteristics, pre- and postoperative hemodynamic data, surgical characteristics, and postoperative follow-up data until hospital discharge were collected.

A total of 308 patients were included: 264 in group 1 (age 63 ± 13 years) and 44 in group 2 (age 83 ± 2 years). Older patients had more comorbidities (atrial fibrillation, history of cardiac decompensation, systemic hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic kidney disease) and they presented more postoperative complications (50.0% vs 33.7%; P = 0.043), with a longer hospital stay (8.9 ± 6.9 vs 6.6 ± 4.6 days; P = 0.005). To assess the burden of age, a propensity score was awarded to postoperative complications. Active smoking, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, associated ischemic heart disease, obesity, and cardio pulmonary by-pass duration were described as independent risk factors. When matched on this propensity score, there was no difference in morbidity or mortality between group 1 and group 2.

Older patients suffered more postoperative complications, which were related to their comorbidities and not only to their age.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus