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Asthma Is Associated With a Subsequent Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Asthma has been associated with the atherosclerosis risk, but not clear of peripheral artery disease (PAD). We attempted to examine the risk of PAD in patients with asthma.

From the insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 28,158 newly diagnosed asthma patients in 2000 to 2005 and 56,316 persons without asthma randomly selected into the comparison cohort, frequency matched by sex, age, and the date of diagnosis. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate the incident PAD. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of PAD were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age, and comorbidities.

The incidence of PAD was 1.46 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort, with an aHR of 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24–1.45]. Incidence of PAD was higher in men, the aged, and those with comorbidities in both cohorts. The aHRs of PAD remained significant for the asthma cohort in all subgroups of sex, age, and the presence of comorbidity. The aHRs of PAD were 14.1 (95% CI = 8.18–24.5) in asthma patients with multiple emergency visits and 22.3 (95% CI = 15.6–31.9) for those with multiple hospitalizations.

Although smoking is a potential confounding factor, this study suggests patients with asthma have a significantly higher risk of developing PAD than the general population. The results also support the notion that poor control of asthma status is a key factor in subsequent PAD development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative incidence of peripheral artery disease for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) asthma.
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Figure 1: Cumulative incidence of peripheral artery disease for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) asthma.

Mentions: We identified 28,158 asthma patients between 2000 and 2005 as the asthma cohort and 56,316 nonasthma subjects as the comparison cohort. In both cohorts, 53.7% were woman and 40.4% were aged between 20 and 49 years (Table 1). The mean age of subjects in the asthma cohort was slightly higher than that in the comparison cohort [54.7 (±17.7) vs. 54.4 (±17.8) years, P < 0.01]. Subjects in the asthma cohort tended to have higher prevalence rates of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, stroke, and CAD than those in the comparison cohort. Figure 1 shows that the cumulative PAD incidence was significantly higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001).


Asthma Is Associated With a Subsequent Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease
Cumulative incidence of peripheral artery disease for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) asthma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998275&req=5

Figure 1: Cumulative incidence of peripheral artery disease for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) asthma.
Mentions: We identified 28,158 asthma patients between 2000 and 2005 as the asthma cohort and 56,316 nonasthma subjects as the comparison cohort. In both cohorts, 53.7% were woman and 40.4% were aged between 20 and 49 years (Table 1). The mean age of subjects in the asthma cohort was slightly higher than that in the comparison cohort [54.7 (±17.7) vs. 54.4 (±17.8) years, P < 0.01]. Subjects in the asthma cohort tended to have higher prevalence rates of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, stroke, and CAD than those in the comparison cohort. Figure 1 shows that the cumulative PAD incidence was significantly higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Asthma has been associated with the atherosclerosis risk, but not clear of peripheral artery disease (PAD). We attempted to examine the risk of PAD in patients with asthma.

From the insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 28,158 newly diagnosed asthma patients in 2000 to 2005 and 56,316 persons without asthma randomly selected into the comparison cohort, frequency matched by sex, age, and the date of diagnosis. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate the incident PAD. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) of PAD were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age, and comorbidities.

The incidence of PAD was 1.46 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort, with an aHR of 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI)&#8202;=&#8202;1.24&ndash;1.45]. Incidence of PAD was higher in men, the aged, and those with comorbidities in both cohorts. The aHRs of PAD remained significant for the asthma cohort in all subgroups of sex, age, and the presence of comorbidity. The aHRs of PAD were 14.1 (95% CI&#8202;=&#8202;8.18&ndash;24.5) in asthma patients with multiple emergency visits and 22.3 (95% CI&#8202;=&#8202;15.6&ndash;31.9) for those with multiple hospitalizations.

Although smoking is a potential confounding factor, this study suggests patients with asthma have a significantly higher risk of developing PAD than the general population. The results also support the notion that poor control of asthma status is a key factor in subsequent PAD development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus