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The contribution of wheat to human diet and health

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ABSTRACT

Wheat is the most important staple crop in temperate zones and is in increasing demand in countries undergoing urbanization and industrialization. In addition to being a major source of starch and energy, wheat also provides substantial amounts of a number of components which are essential or beneficial for health, notably protein, vitamins (notably B vitamins), dietary fiber, and phytochemicals. Of these, wheat is a particularly important source of dietary fiber, with bread alone providing 20% of the daily intake in the UK, and well‐established relationships between the consumption of cereal dietary fiber and reduced risk of cardio‐vascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and forms of cancer (notably colo‐rectal cancer). Wheat shows high variability in the contents and compositions of beneficial components, with some (including dietary fiber) showing high heritability. Hence, plant breeders should be able to select for enhanced health benefits in addition to increased crop yield.

No MeSH data available.


Summary of the heritability of dietary fiber and other components in wheat grain, based on the HEALTHGRAIN study. “Other” includes variance ascribed to Genotype × Environment interactions and/or error.
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fes364-fig-0002: Summary of the heritability of dietary fiber and other components in wheat grain, based on the HEALTHGRAIN study. “Other” includes variance ascribed to Genotype × Environment interactions and/or error.

Mentions: The “broad sense heritability” of grain components can be calculated by comparing the compositions of samples of multiple genotypes grown in multiple environments (sites and or years). Relatively little information is available on the heritability of most grain components, with the most complete series of studies being carried out under the HEALTHGRAIN program. This included multisite trials, in which 23–26 cultivars were grown in either four environments (for B vitamins) or six environments (for other components) (Shewry et al. 2010, 2011; Corol et al. 2012). The results of these studies are summarized in Fig. 2. Alkylresorcinols, sterols and tocols all show high heritability (above 50%), whereas B vitamins, methyl donors (choline, betaine), and phenolic acids all have low heritability with high effects of environment (or G × E interactions).


The contribution of wheat to human diet and health
Summary of the heritability of dietary fiber and other components in wheat grain, based on the HEALTHGRAIN study. “Other” includes variance ascribed to Genotype × Environment interactions and/or error.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4998136&req=5

fes364-fig-0002: Summary of the heritability of dietary fiber and other components in wheat grain, based on the HEALTHGRAIN study. “Other” includes variance ascribed to Genotype × Environment interactions and/or error.
Mentions: The “broad sense heritability” of grain components can be calculated by comparing the compositions of samples of multiple genotypes grown in multiple environments (sites and or years). Relatively little information is available on the heritability of most grain components, with the most complete series of studies being carried out under the HEALTHGRAIN program. This included multisite trials, in which 23–26 cultivars were grown in either four environments (for B vitamins) or six environments (for other components) (Shewry et al. 2010, 2011; Corol et al. 2012). The results of these studies are summarized in Fig. 2. Alkylresorcinols, sterols and tocols all show high heritability (above 50%), whereas B vitamins, methyl donors (choline, betaine), and phenolic acids all have low heritability with high effects of environment (or G × E interactions).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Wheat is the most important staple crop in temperate zones and is in increasing demand in countries undergoing urbanization and industrialization. In addition to being a major source of starch and energy, wheat also provides substantial amounts of a number of components which are essential or beneficial for health, notably protein, vitamins (notably B vitamins), dietary fiber, and phytochemicals. Of these, wheat is a particularly important source of dietary fiber, with bread alone providing 20% of the daily intake in the UK, and well‐established relationships between the consumption of cereal dietary fiber and reduced risk of cardio‐vascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and forms of cancer (notably colo‐rectal cancer). Wheat shows high variability in the contents and compositions of beneficial components, with some (including dietary fiber) showing high heritability. Hence, plant breeders should be able to select for enhanced health benefits in addition to increased crop yield.

No MeSH data available.