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Periodontal Pathogens are Likely to be Responsible for the Development of Ankylosing Spondylitis

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The role of oral bacteria in the etiology of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is examined in this review. Periodontitis is related to AS to a significant degree, and periodontitis is significantly more prevalent in patients with AS. Anti-Pophyromonas gingivalis and anti-Prevotella intermedia antibodies titers are higher in AS patients than in healthy subjects. Eight randomized controlled trials that used sulfasalazine were reviewed. Moxifloxacin and rifamycin are significantly effective in the treatment of AS. Periodontal pathogens are likely to be responsible for the development of AS in genetically susceptible individuals. These results will guide more comprehensive and efficacious treatment strategies for AS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Antigen presentation in ankylosing spondylitis.
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Figure 1: Antigen presentation in ankylosing spondylitis.


Periodontal Pathogens are Likely to be Responsible for the Development of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Antigen presentation in ankylosing spondylitis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4997922&req=5

Figure 1: Antigen presentation in ankylosing spondylitis.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The role of oral bacteria in the etiology of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is examined in this review. Periodontitis is related to AS to a significant degree, and periodontitis is significantly more prevalent in patients with AS. Anti-Pophyromonas gingivalis and anti-Prevotella intermedia antibodies titers are higher in AS patients than in healthy subjects. Eight randomized controlled trials that used sulfasalazine were reviewed. Moxifloxacin and rifamycin are significantly effective in the treatment of AS. Periodontal pathogens are likely to be responsible for the development of AS in genetically susceptible individuals. These results will guide more comprehensive and efficacious treatment strategies for AS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus