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Dangerous universal donors: the reality of the Hemocentro in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais

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ABSTRACT

Background: The term dangerous universal blood donor refers to potential agglutination of the erythrocytes of non-O recipients due to plasma of an O blood group donor, which contains high titers of anti-A and/or anti-B hemagglutinins. Thus, prior titration of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins is recommended to prevent transfusion reactions.

Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of dangerous universal donors in the blood bank of Belo Horizonte (Fundação Central de Imuno-Hematologia – Fundação Hemominas – Minas Gerais) by determining the titers of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins in O blood group donors.

Method: A total of 400 O blood group donors were randomly selected, from March 2014 to January 2015. The titers of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins (IgM and IgG classes) were obtained using the tube titration technique. Dangerous donors were those whose titers of anti-A or anti-B IgM were ≥128 and/or the titers of anti-A or anti-B IgG were ≥256. Donors were characterized according to gender, age and ethnicity. The hemagglutinins were characterized by specificity (anti-A and anti-B) and antibody class (IgG and IgM).

Results: Almost one-third (30.5%) of the O blood group donors were universal dangerous. The frequency among women was higher than that of men (p-value = 0.019; odds ratio: 1.66; 95% confidence interval: 1.08–2.56) and among young donors (18–29 years old) it was higher than for donors between 49 and 59 years old (p-value = 0.015; odds ratio: 3.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–7.69). There was no significant association between dangerous universal donors and ethnicity, agglutinin specificity or antibody class.

Conclusion: Especially platelet concentrates obtained by apheresis (that contain a substantial volume of plasma), coming from dangerous universal donors should be transfused in isogroup recipients whenever possible in order to prevent the occurrence of transfusion reactions.

No MeSH data available.


Absolute frequency of donors stratified by age and classified as dangerous or non-dangerous. *Significant difference between groups (p-value <0.05).
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fig0020: Absolute frequency of donors stratified by age and classified as dangerous or non-dangerous. *Significant difference between groups (p-value <0.05).

Mentions: Regarding the age group, of the 400 donors included in this survey, 169 (42.2%) donors were between 18 and 28 years old, 116 (29.0%) were from 29 to 38 years old, 69 (17.3%) from 39 to 48 years old, 36 (9.0%) between 49 and 58 years old and 10 (2.5%) were from 59 to 69 years old. Of the 122 donors classified as dangerous, 64 (52.4%) belonged to the 18–28 year-old age group, 32 (26.2%) to the 29–38 year-old group, 18 (14.8%) to the 39–48 year-old group, six (5.0%) to the 49–58 year-old group and two (1.6%) to the 59–69 year-old group. On applying the chi-square test, there were no significant differences except in respect to the 18–28 year-old and 49–58 years-old groups (p-value = 0.015). For the 59–69 year-old group, statistical analysis used the Fisher's exact test and there were no significant differences compared to the other groups (Figure 4).


Dangerous universal donors: the reality of the Hemocentro in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais
Absolute frequency of donors stratified by age and classified as dangerous or non-dangerous. *Significant difference between groups (p-value <0.05).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4997901&req=5

fig0020: Absolute frequency of donors stratified by age and classified as dangerous or non-dangerous. *Significant difference between groups (p-value <0.05).
Mentions: Regarding the age group, of the 400 donors included in this survey, 169 (42.2%) donors were between 18 and 28 years old, 116 (29.0%) were from 29 to 38 years old, 69 (17.3%) from 39 to 48 years old, 36 (9.0%) between 49 and 58 years old and 10 (2.5%) were from 59 to 69 years old. Of the 122 donors classified as dangerous, 64 (52.4%) belonged to the 18–28 year-old age group, 32 (26.2%) to the 29–38 year-old group, 18 (14.8%) to the 39–48 year-old group, six (5.0%) to the 49–58 year-old group and two (1.6%) to the 59–69 year-old group. On applying the chi-square test, there were no significant differences except in respect to the 18–28 year-old and 49–58 years-old groups (p-value = 0.015). For the 59–69 year-old group, statistical analysis used the Fisher's exact test and there were no significant differences compared to the other groups (Figure 4).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The term dangerous universal blood donor refers to potential agglutination of the erythrocytes of non-O recipients due to plasma of an O blood group donor, which contains high titers of anti-A and/or anti-B hemagglutinins. Thus, prior titration of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins is recommended to prevent transfusion reactions.

Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of dangerous universal donors in the blood bank of Belo Horizonte (Funda&ccedil;&atilde;o Central de Imuno-Hematologia &ndash; Funda&ccedil;&atilde;o Hemominas &ndash; Minas Gerais) by determining the titers of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins in O blood group donors.

Method: A total of 400 O blood group donors were randomly selected, from March 2014 to January 2015. The titers of anti-A and anti-B hemagglutinins (IgM and IgG classes) were obtained using the tube titration technique. Dangerous donors were those whose titers of anti-A or anti-B IgM were &ge;128 and/or the titers of anti-A or anti-B IgG were &ge;256. Donors were characterized according to gender, age and ethnicity. The hemagglutinins were characterized by specificity (anti-A and anti-B) and antibody class (IgG and IgM).

Results: Almost one-third (30.5%) of the O blood group donors were universal dangerous. The frequency among women was higher than that of men (p-value&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.019; odds ratio: 1.66; 95% confidence interval: 1.08&ndash;2.56) and among young donors (18&ndash;29 years old) it was higher than for donors between 49 and 59 years old (p-value&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.015; odds ratio: 3.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.22&ndash;7.69). There was no significant association between dangerous universal donors and ethnicity, agglutinin specificity or antibody class.

Conclusion: Especially platelet concentrates obtained by apheresis (that contain a substantial volume of plasma), coming from dangerous universal donors should be transfused in isogroup recipients whenever possible in order to prevent the occurrence of transfusion reactions.

No MeSH data available.