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Salt intake belief, knowledge, and behavior: a cross-sectional study of older rural Chinese adults.

Zhang J, Wu T, Chu H, Feng X, Shi J, Zhang R, Zhang Y, Zhang J, Li N, Yan L, Niu W, Wu Y - Medicine (Baltimore) (2016)

Bottom Line: Healthy salt intake behavior was more common among women (P < 0.01) and was positively associated with age (P < 0.01) and poorer health status (P < 0.01), but negatively associated with years in school (P < 0.05).After adjusting for age, sex, years in school, and health status, participants who believed in the harm of high salt intake were more likely to have healthy salt intake behavior, compared with those who did not believe (Odds Ratio = 1.6, P < 0.001).Knowledge of salt intake was not significantly related to healthy salt intake behavior.Our study demonstrated that belief in the harm of high salt intake rather than knowledge about salt and health was associated with healthy salt intake behavior, independent of age, sex, years in school, and health status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aThe George Institute for Global Health at Peking University Health Science Center bPeking University Clinical Research Institute, Beijing cChangzhi Medical College, Shanxi dFirst Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning eXi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi fNingxia Medical University, Ningxia gHebei Province Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Hebei, China hThe George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Australia iInstitute of Social Medicine and Health Service Management, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China jDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Excess sodium consumption is a major cause of high blood pressure and subsequent vascular disease. However, the factors driving people's salt intake behavior remains largely unknown. This study aims to assess the relationship of salt intake behaviors with knowledge and belief on salt and health among older adults in rural China.A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 4693 older participants (men ≥50 and women ≥60 years old) randomly selected from 120 rural villages in 5 northern provinces in China. Healthy salt intake behavior was defined as either not eating pickled foods or not adding pickles/soy sauce/salt when food was not salty enough in prior 3 months.There were 81% participants having healthy salt intake behavior. Healthy salt intake behavior was more common among women (P < 0.01) and was positively associated with age (P < 0.01) and poorer health status (P < 0.01), but negatively associated with years in school (P < 0.05). After adjusting for age, sex, years in school, and health status, participants who believed in the harm of high salt intake were more likely to have healthy salt intake behavior, compared with those who did not believe (Odds Ratio = 1.6, P < 0.001). Knowledge of salt intake was not significantly related to healthy salt intake behavior.Our study demonstrated that belief in the harm of high salt intake rather than knowledge about salt and health was associated with healthy salt intake behavior, independent of age, sex, years in school, and health status. Future population salt reduction programs should place more emphasis on establishing health beliefs rather than only delivering salt-related knowledge.Clinical trial registration number of the study is NCT01259700.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship of healthy salt-taking behavior with health status, after adjusting by sex, age, years of education, belief, knowledge, and clustering effect.
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Figure 2: The relationship of healthy salt-taking behavior with health status, after adjusting by sex, age, years of education, belief, knowledge, and clustering effect.

Mentions: Health status had a very strong impact on healthy salt intake behavior. Compared with apparently healthy participants, participants with CVD were most likely to have more healthy salt intake behaviors as well as those aware of their hypertension. However, those unaware of their hypertension were less likely to have more healthy salt intake behaviors, after adjusting for belief, knowledge, sex, age, and years of education (Fig. 2).


Salt intake belief, knowledge, and behavior: a cross-sectional study of older rural Chinese adults.

Zhang J, Wu T, Chu H, Feng X, Shi J, Zhang R, Zhang Y, Zhang J, Li N, Yan L, Niu W, Wu Y - Medicine (Baltimore) (2016)

The relationship of healthy salt-taking behavior with health status, after adjusting by sex, age, years of education, belief, knowledge, and clustering effect.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979810&req=5

Figure 2: The relationship of healthy salt-taking behavior with health status, after adjusting by sex, age, years of education, belief, knowledge, and clustering effect.
Mentions: Health status had a very strong impact on healthy salt intake behavior. Compared with apparently healthy participants, participants with CVD were most likely to have more healthy salt intake behaviors as well as those aware of their hypertension. However, those unaware of their hypertension were less likely to have more healthy salt intake behaviors, after adjusting for belief, knowledge, sex, age, and years of education (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Healthy salt intake behavior was more common among women (P < 0.01) and was positively associated with age (P < 0.01) and poorer health status (P < 0.01), but negatively associated with years in school (P < 0.05).After adjusting for age, sex, years in school, and health status, participants who believed in the harm of high salt intake were more likely to have healthy salt intake behavior, compared with those who did not believe (Odds Ratio = 1.6, P < 0.001).Knowledge of salt intake was not significantly related to healthy salt intake behavior.Our study demonstrated that belief in the harm of high salt intake rather than knowledge about salt and health was associated with healthy salt intake behavior, independent of age, sex, years in school, and health status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aThe George Institute for Global Health at Peking University Health Science Center bPeking University Clinical Research Institute, Beijing cChangzhi Medical College, Shanxi dFirst Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning eXi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi fNingxia Medical University, Ningxia gHebei Province Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Hebei, China hThe George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Australia iInstitute of Social Medicine and Health Service Management, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China jDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Peking University School of Public Health, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Excess sodium consumption is a major cause of high blood pressure and subsequent vascular disease. However, the factors driving people's salt intake behavior remains largely unknown. This study aims to assess the relationship of salt intake behaviors with knowledge and belief on salt and health among older adults in rural China.A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 4693 older participants (men ≥50 and women ≥60 years old) randomly selected from 120 rural villages in 5 northern provinces in China. Healthy salt intake behavior was defined as either not eating pickled foods or not adding pickles/soy sauce/salt when food was not salty enough in prior 3 months.There were 81% participants having healthy salt intake behavior. Healthy salt intake behavior was more common among women (P < 0.01) and was positively associated with age (P < 0.01) and poorer health status (P < 0.01), but negatively associated with years in school (P < 0.05). After adjusting for age, sex, years in school, and health status, participants who believed in the harm of high salt intake were more likely to have healthy salt intake behavior, compared with those who did not believe (Odds Ratio = 1.6, P < 0.001). Knowledge of salt intake was not significantly related to healthy salt intake behavior.Our study demonstrated that belief in the harm of high salt intake rather than knowledge about salt and health was associated with healthy salt intake behavior, independent of age, sex, years in school, and health status. Future population salt reduction programs should place more emphasis on establishing health beliefs rather than only delivering salt-related knowledge.Clinical trial registration number of the study is NCT01259700.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus