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Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of Barrett esophagus: A meta-analysis.

He Q, Li JD, Huang W, Zhu WC, Yang JQ - Medicine (Baltimore) (2016)

Bottom Line: The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03-1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82-1.38; P = 0.627).No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23).Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aDepartment of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University bDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barrett esophagus (BE) is considered precursor condition of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing in general population. Studies reported that metabolic syndrome (MS) or diabetes mellitus (DM) is related to increased risk of BE. Current study was to assess and better understand the relationship between MS /DM and BE.

Methods: Electronic search was conducted in the database Pubmed/Medline (-December, 2015), Embase (-December, 2015), Cochrane Library (-December, 2015), and Web of Knowledge (-December, 2015). Studies included were assessed with summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and compared exposure group with control group. The heterogeneity was examined by the funnel plot and the Egger's test. Subgroup analyses and sensitive analyses were performed for the detection of possible heterogeneity and impact on stability of analysis results.

Results: Twelve publications met the criteria and included 355,311 subjects were analyzed. The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03-1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82-1.38; P = 0.627). Substantial heterogeneities were detected. No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23).

Conclusions: Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE. Further long-term follow-up prospective study needs to verify the current results, and definite pathophysiological mechanism needs to be further investigated and clearly elucidated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot based on diagnosis of MS and DM for the risk of BE. BE = Barrett esophagus, DM = diabetes mellitus, MS = metabolic syndrome
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Figure 2: Forest plot based on diagnosis of MS and DM for the risk of BE. BE = Barrett esophagus, DM = diabetes mellitus, MS = metabolic syndrome

Mentions: Because of substantial heterogeneity detected by fix-effects model (I2 = 62.8%, P = 0.001), random-effect model was used in the meta-analysis. The overall effect revealed that MS and DM significantly increased the risk of BE (OR = 1.16; 95%CI 1.03–1.31; P = 0.018) (χ2 = 32.26; I2 = 62.8%, P = 0.018). Based on the diagnosis of MS and DM, the results revealed that DM was not associated with the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82–1.38; P = 0.627); however, MS considerably increased the risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024) (Fig. 2, Table 2).


Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of Barrett esophagus: A meta-analysis.

He Q, Li JD, Huang W, Zhu WC, Yang JQ - Medicine (Baltimore) (2016)

Forest plot based on diagnosis of MS and DM for the risk of BE. BE = Barrett esophagus, DM = diabetes mellitus, MS = metabolic syndrome
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979793&req=5

Figure 2: Forest plot based on diagnosis of MS and DM for the risk of BE. BE = Barrett esophagus, DM = diabetes mellitus, MS = metabolic syndrome
Mentions: Because of substantial heterogeneity detected by fix-effects model (I2 = 62.8%, P = 0.001), random-effect model was used in the meta-analysis. The overall effect revealed that MS and DM significantly increased the risk of BE (OR = 1.16; 95%CI 1.03–1.31; P = 0.018) (χ2 = 32.26; I2 = 62.8%, P = 0.018). Based on the diagnosis of MS and DM, the results revealed that DM was not associated with the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82–1.38; P = 0.627); however, MS considerably increased the risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024) (Fig. 2, Table 2).

Bottom Line: The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03-1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82-1.38; P = 0.627).No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23).Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: aDepartment of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University bDepartment of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Barrett esophagus (BE) is considered precursor condition of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing in general population. Studies reported that metabolic syndrome (MS) or diabetes mellitus (DM) is related to increased risk of BE. Current study was to assess and better understand the relationship between MS /DM and BE.

Methods: Electronic search was conducted in the database Pubmed/Medline (-December, 2015), Embase (-December, 2015), Cochrane Library (-December, 2015), and Web of Knowledge (-December, 2015). Studies included were assessed with summary odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and compared exposure group with control group. The heterogeneity was examined by the funnel plot and the Egger's test. Subgroup analyses and sensitive analyses were performed for the detection of possible heterogeneity and impact on stability of analysis results.

Results: Twelve publications met the criteria and included 355,311 subjects were analyzed. The pooled results showed MS was closely associated with increased risk of BE (OR = 1.23; 95%CI 1.03-1.47; P = 0.024), and yet DM did not significantly increase the risk of BE (OR = 1.07; 95%CI 0.82-1.38; P = 0.627). Substantial heterogeneities were detected. No significant publication bias was detected by Egger's test (P = 0.23).

Conclusions: Based on the results of current meta-analysis, MS is associated with increased risk of BE. Further long-term follow-up prospective study needs to verify the current results, and definite pathophysiological mechanism needs to be further investigated and clearly elucidated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus