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Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface

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ABSTRACT

This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200–1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core–shell Cu–rGO or Cu2O–rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200–1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure.

No MeSH data available.


FE-SEM image of (a) single particle showing the different facets (b) schematic crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38].
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Figure 6: FE-SEM image of (a) single particle showing the different facets (b) schematic crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38].

Mentions: The FE-SEM image (Fig. 6) shows the faceted morphology of the core–shell Cu-rGO particle of the sample prepared at 1000 °C, and the corresponding three-dimensional equilibrium crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38] (Fig. 6). For the simulation, the crystallographic directions were estimated from the symmetries of the facets [39]. The facets present correspond to {111}, {110}, {100}, {113} and {530}. It is worthy to note that {530} facets are not typically reported for highly pure Cu, but in this case, as explained by Meltzman et al. [40], the presence of carbon layers at the surface, modifies the anisotropy giving rise to the appearance of other facets.


Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface
FE-SEM image of (a) single particle showing the different facets (b) schematic crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38].
© Copyright Policy - Beilstein
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979746&req=5

Figure 6: FE-SEM image of (a) single particle showing the different facets (b) schematic crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38].
Mentions: The FE-SEM image (Fig. 6) shows the faceted morphology of the core–shell Cu-rGO particle of the sample prepared at 1000 °C, and the corresponding three-dimensional equilibrium crystal shape created using the Wulffman freeware [37–38] (Fig. 6). For the simulation, the crystallographic directions were estimated from the symmetries of the facets [39]. The facets present correspond to {111}, {110}, {100}, {113} and {530}. It is worthy to note that {530} facets are not typically reported for highly pure Cu, but in this case, as explained by Meltzman et al. [40], the presence of carbon layers at the surface, modifies the anisotropy giving rise to the appearance of other facets.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200–1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core–shell Cu–rGO or Cu2O–rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200–1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure.

No MeSH data available.