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Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

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ABSTRACT

Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup.

No MeSH data available.


Simple model for two coupled harmonic oscillators, each represented by a mass (m1, m2), a sping (k1, k2) and a damping element (d1, d2). The system is excited to oscillations by a periodic force with the driving angular frequency ωD = 2πfD applied to the first subsystem. Interactions between the system and external influences are modeled by an additional spring k3 and the damping element d3. For the described sensor setup, subsystem 1 corresponds to the cantilever and subsystem 2 to a FeCNT.
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Figure 1: Simple model for two coupled harmonic oscillators, each represented by a mass (m1, m2), a sping (k1, k2) and a damping element (d1, d2). The system is excited to oscillations by a periodic force with the driving angular frequency ωD = 2πfD applied to the first subsystem. Interactions between the system and external influences are modeled by an additional spring k3 and the damping element d3. For the described sensor setup, subsystem 1 corresponds to the cantilever and subsystem 2 to a FeCNT.

Mentions: By applying the harmonic oscillator model for both subsystems of our sensor approach, the simple model of a coupled harmonic oscillating system is derived as depicted in Fig. 1. It consists of a spring, a mass and a damping element for each subsystem. Furthermore, there are an additional spring k3 and a damping element d3, modeling interactions between the coupled system and external influences. The oscillation of the coupled system is driven by a periodic force applied to the bigger subsystem.


Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor
Simple model for two coupled harmonic oscillators, each represented by a mass (m1, m2), a sping (k1, k2) and a damping element (d1, d2). The system is excited to oscillations by a periodic force with the driving angular frequency ωD = 2πfD applied to the first subsystem. Interactions between the system and external influences are modeled by an additional spring k3 and the damping element d3. For the described sensor setup, subsystem 1 corresponds to the cantilever and subsystem 2 to a FeCNT.
© Copyright Policy - Beilstein
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979692&req=5

Figure 1: Simple model for two coupled harmonic oscillators, each represented by a mass (m1, m2), a sping (k1, k2) and a damping element (d1, d2). The system is excited to oscillations by a periodic force with the driving angular frequency ωD = 2πfD applied to the first subsystem. Interactions between the system and external influences are modeled by an additional spring k3 and the damping element d3. For the described sensor setup, subsystem 1 corresponds to the cantilever and subsystem 2 to a FeCNT.
Mentions: By applying the harmonic oscillator model for both subsystems of our sensor approach, the simple model of a coupled harmonic oscillating system is derived as depicted in Fig. 1. It consists of a spring, a mass and a damping element for each subsystem. Furthermore, there are an additional spring k3 and a damping element d3, modeling interactions between the coupled system and external influences. The oscillation of the coupled system is driven by a periodic force applied to the bigger subsystem.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup.

No MeSH data available.