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Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics

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ABSTRACT

The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

No MeSH data available.


Cytosolic delivery of GFP to cells using nanoparticle-stabilized nanocapsules. Adapted with permission from [63]. Copyright (2013) American Chemical Society.
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Figure 4: Cytosolic delivery of GFP to cells using nanoparticle-stabilized nanocapsules. Adapted with permission from [63]. Copyright (2013) American Chemical Society.

Mentions: Driven by the desire to deliver biological payloads directly to the cytosol, we tested our system for the very challenging goal of protein delivery using green fluorescent protein (GFP). It worked even better than we hoped, with complete cytosolar distribution of the GFP observed (Fig. 4) [63]. This ability to "dump" proteins into cells is unprecedented, allowing us to deliver proteins capable of intracellular localization – the next frontier of targeting [64]. We also made use of the oil interior of the capsule to provide dual protein (caspase 3) and therapeutic (paclitaxel) delivery where the two payloads worked synergistically for chemotherapy [65]. Being supramolecular types, we figured we could swap out the anionic proteins used above for anionic siRNA [66]. In this case we were right – we can deliver siRNA directly into the cytosol with great efficiency [67].


Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics
Cytosolic delivery of GFP to cells using nanoparticle-stabilized nanocapsules. Adapted with permission from [63]. Copyright (2013) American Chemical Society.
© Copyright Policy - Beilstein
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979691&req=5

Figure 4: Cytosolic delivery of GFP to cells using nanoparticle-stabilized nanocapsules. Adapted with permission from [63]. Copyright (2013) American Chemical Society.
Mentions: Driven by the desire to deliver biological payloads directly to the cytosol, we tested our system for the very challenging goal of protein delivery using green fluorescent protein (GFP). It worked even better than we hoped, with complete cytosolar distribution of the GFP observed (Fig. 4) [63]. This ability to "dump" proteins into cells is unprecedented, allowing us to deliver proteins capable of intracellular localization – the next frontier of targeting [64]. We also made use of the oil interior of the capsule to provide dual protein (caspase 3) and therapeutic (paclitaxel) delivery where the two payloads worked synergistically for chemotherapy [65]. Being supramolecular types, we figured we could swap out the anionic proteins used above for anionic siRNA [66]. In this case we were right – we can deliver siRNA directly into the cytosol with great efficiency [67].

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

No MeSH data available.