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Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics

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ABSTRACT

The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

No MeSH data available.


Recognition-mediated assembly of nanoparticle–polymer constructs. Reproduced from [24].
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Figure 3: Recognition-mediated assembly of nanoparticle–polymer constructs. Reproduced from [24].

Mentions: As I mentioned above, I am an incessant tinkerer, a trait that has rubbed off on the group. When students mixed complementary versions of the polymers and nanoparticles described above, we were quite surprised to find that we generated regular spherical and network structures (Fig. 3) [24]. This "bricks and mortar" assembly process provides a modular system where structure and stoichiometry of the components drives structure formation. These assemblies set us on a path of generating nanocomposite materials, including regular structures using diblock copolymers [25–26] and nanoparticle–protein [27–28] and nanoparticle–nucleic acid composites [29].


Organic chemistry meets polymers, nanoscience, therapeutics and diagnostics
Recognition-mediated assembly of nanoparticle–polymer constructs. Reproduced from [24].
© Copyright Policy - Beilstein
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979691&req=5

Figure 3: Recognition-mediated assembly of nanoparticle–polymer constructs. Reproduced from [24].
Mentions: As I mentioned above, I am an incessant tinkerer, a trait that has rubbed off on the group. When students mixed complementary versions of the polymers and nanoparticles described above, we were quite surprised to find that we generated regular spherical and network structures (Fig. 3) [24]. This "bricks and mortar" assembly process provides a modular system where structure and stoichiometry of the components drives structure formation. These assemblies set us on a path of generating nanocomposite materials, including regular structures using diblock copolymers [25–26] and nanoparticle–protein [27–28] and nanoparticle–nucleic acid composites [29].

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The atom-by-atom control provided by synthetic organic chemistry presents a means of generating new functional nanomaterials with great precision. Bringing together these two very disparate skill sets is, however, quite uncommon. This autobiographical review provides some insight into how my program evolved, as well as giving some idea of where we are going.

No MeSH data available.