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Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response

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ABSTRACT

A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Photography of the ECM samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 300, 430 and 600 nm from the left, respectively. The sizes were chosen as to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample is probed. (b) Photography of the sample prepared by a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 600 nm with flashlight to illustrate the diffraction pattern (the scale bar does not apply to this photo).
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Figure 3: (a) Photography of the ECM samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 300, 430 and 600 nm from the left, respectively. The sizes were chosen as to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample is probed. (b) Photography of the sample prepared by a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 600 nm with flashlight to illustrate the diffraction pattern (the scale bar does not apply to this photo).

Mentions: In total, nine different samples have been prepared, each covering approximately 3 cm2, together with three reference samples of a deposition angle of 0°. Fig. 3 shows a photograph of the samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60°, the samples with 600 nm interpore distance show good diffraction (Fig. 3) while the samples with 430 nm interpore distance show moderate blue diffraction and the samples with 300 nm show no diffraction. However, the size of the samples are only limited by the size of the original molds, which were fabricated by another scalable technique, but the size of the samples was chosen to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample are probed at any given time.


Large-scale fabrication of achiral plasmonic metamaterials with giant chiroptical response
(a) Photography of the ECM samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 300, 430 and 600 nm from the left, respectively. The sizes were chosen as to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample is probed. (b) Photography of the sample prepared by a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 600 nm with flashlight to illustrate the diffraction pattern (the scale bar does not apply to this photo).
© Copyright Policy - Beilstein
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979657&req=5

Figure 3: (a) Photography of the ECM samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 300, 430 and 600 nm from the left, respectively. The sizes were chosen as to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample is probed. (b) Photography of the sample prepared by a deposition angle of 60° and interpore distance of 600 nm with flashlight to illustrate the diffraction pattern (the scale bar does not apply to this photo).
Mentions: In total, nine different samples have been prepared, each covering approximately 3 cm2, together with three reference samples of a deposition angle of 0°. Fig. 3 shows a photograph of the samples prepared at a deposition angle of 60°, the samples with 600 nm interpore distance show good diffraction (Fig. 3) while the samples with 430 nm interpore distance show moderate blue diffraction and the samples with 300 nm show no diffraction. However, the size of the samples are only limited by the size of the original molds, which were fabricated by another scalable technique, but the size of the samples was chosen to be compatible with commercial dismantled cuvettes and only a small area of the sample are probed at any given time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

A variety of extrinsic chiral metamaterials were fabricated by a combination of self-ordering anodic oxidation of aluminum foil, nanoimprint lithography and glancing angle deposition. All of these techniques are scalable and pose a significant improvement to standard metamaterial fabrication techniques. Different interpore distances and glancing angle depositions enable the plasmonic resonance wavelength to be tunable in the range from UVA to IR. These extrinsic chiral metamaterials only exhibit significant chiroptical response at non-normal angles of incidence. This intrinsic property enables the probing of both enantoimeric structures on the same sample, by inverting the tilt of the sample relative to the normal angle. In biosensor applications this allows for more precise, cheap and commercialized devices. As a proof of concept two different molecules were used to probe the sensitivity of the metamaterials. These proved the applicability to sense proteins through non-specific adsorption on the metamaterial surface or through functionalized surfaces to increase the sensing sensitivity. Besides increasing the sensing sensitivity, these metamaterials may also be commercialized and find applications in surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, terahertz generation and terahertz circular dichroism spectroscopy.

No MeSH data available.