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Global attention facilitates the planning, but not execution of goal-directed reaches.

McCarthy JD, Song JH - J Vis (2016)

Bottom Line: When fetching a mug from the cupboard, for example, attention not only has to be allocated to the object, but also the handle.We found that reaches were initiated faster when a task-irrelevant illusory figure was present independent of color repetition.In contrast, local color priming is evident throughout goal-directed reaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In daily life, humans interact with multiple objects in complex environments. A large body of literature demonstrates that target selection is biased toward recently attended features, such that reaches are faster and trajectory curvature is reduced when target features (i.e., color) are repeated (priming of pop-out). In the real world, however, objects are comprised of several features-some of which may be more suitable for action than others. When fetching a mug from the cupboard, for example, attention not only has to be allocated to the object, but also the handle. To date, no study has investigated the impact of hierarchical feature organization on target selection for action. Here, we employed a color-oddity search task in which targets were Pac-men (i.e., a circle with a triangle cut out) oriented to be either consistent or inconsistent with the percept of a global Kanizsa triangle. We found that reaches were initiated faster when a task-irrelevant illusory figure was present independent of color repetition. Additionally, consistent with priming of pop-out, both reach planning and execution were facilitated when local target colors were repeated, regardless of whether a global figure was present. We also demonstrated that figures defined by illusory, but not real contours, afforded an early target selection benefit. In sum, these findings suggest that when local targets are perceptually grouped to form an illusory surface, attention quickly spreads across the global figure and facilitates the early stage of reach planning, but not execution. In contrast, local color priming is evident throughout goal-directed reaching.

No MeSH data available.


Stimuli used in the third experiment. Pac-men targets give rise to the percept of a modally completed triangle (left). Pac-men surrounded by a circle support the percept of an amodally completed triangle behind three circular apertures (middle). A triangle defined by a real contour occludes three circular targets (right).
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i1534-7362-16-9-7-f06: Stimuli used in the third experiment. Pac-men targets give rise to the percept of a modally completed triangle (left). Pac-men surrounded by a circle support the percept of an amodally completed triangle behind three circular apertures (middle). A triangle defined by a real contour occludes three circular targets (right).

Mentions: To address this question, we modified the color-oddity search task to include modally and amodally completed figures, as well as figures defined by real contours (Figure 6). We examined whether modal and amodal completion—both of which rely on perceptual grouping to form figure percepts—similarly facilitate the early stages of target selection, as well as how they may or may not differ from real figures with explicit contour information.


Global attention facilitates the planning, but not execution of goal-directed reaches.

McCarthy JD, Song JH - J Vis (2016)

Stimuli used in the third experiment. Pac-men targets give rise to the percept of a modally completed triangle (left). Pac-men surrounded by a circle support the percept of an amodally completed triangle behind three circular apertures (middle). A triangle defined by a real contour occludes three circular targets (right).
© Copyright Policy - cc-by-nc-nd
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979628&req=5

i1534-7362-16-9-7-f06: Stimuli used in the third experiment. Pac-men targets give rise to the percept of a modally completed triangle (left). Pac-men surrounded by a circle support the percept of an amodally completed triangle behind three circular apertures (middle). A triangle defined by a real contour occludes three circular targets (right).
Mentions: To address this question, we modified the color-oddity search task to include modally and amodally completed figures, as well as figures defined by real contours (Figure 6). We examined whether modal and amodal completion—both of which rely on perceptual grouping to form figure percepts—similarly facilitate the early stages of target selection, as well as how they may or may not differ from real figures with explicit contour information.

Bottom Line: When fetching a mug from the cupboard, for example, attention not only has to be allocated to the object, but also the handle.We found that reaches were initiated faster when a task-irrelevant illusory figure was present independent of color repetition.In contrast, local color priming is evident throughout goal-directed reaching.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In daily life, humans interact with multiple objects in complex environments. A large body of literature demonstrates that target selection is biased toward recently attended features, such that reaches are faster and trajectory curvature is reduced when target features (i.e., color) are repeated (priming of pop-out). In the real world, however, objects are comprised of several features-some of which may be more suitable for action than others. When fetching a mug from the cupboard, for example, attention not only has to be allocated to the object, but also the handle. To date, no study has investigated the impact of hierarchical feature organization on target selection for action. Here, we employed a color-oddity search task in which targets were Pac-men (i.e., a circle with a triangle cut out) oriented to be either consistent or inconsistent with the percept of a global Kanizsa triangle. We found that reaches were initiated faster when a task-irrelevant illusory figure was present independent of color repetition. Additionally, consistent with priming of pop-out, both reach planning and execution were facilitated when local target colors were repeated, regardless of whether a global figure was present. We also demonstrated that figures defined by illusory, but not real contours, afforded an early target selection benefit. In sum, these findings suggest that when local targets are perceptually grouped to form an illusory surface, attention quickly spreads across the global figure and facilitates the early stage of reach planning, but not execution. In contrast, local color priming is evident throughout goal-directed reaching.

No MeSH data available.