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Physical activity and risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke events: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Kyu HH, Bachman VF, Alexander LT, Mumford JE, Afshin A, Estep K, Veerman JL, Delwiche K, Iannarone ML, Moyer ML, Cercy K, Vos T, Murray CJ, Forouzanfar MH - BMJ (2016)

Bottom Line: An increase from 600 to 3600 MET minutes/week reduced the risk by an additional 19%.Compared with insufficiently active individuals (total activity <600 MET minutes/week), the risk reduction for those in the highly active category (≥8000 MET minutes/week) was 14% (relative risk 0.863, 95% uncertainty interval 0.829 to 0.900) for breast cancer; 21% (0.789, 0.735 to 0.850) for colon cancer; 28% (0.722, 0.678 to 0.768) for diabetes; 25% (0.754, 0.704 to 0.809) for ischemic heart disease; and 26% (0.736, 0.659 to 0.811) for ischemic stroke.  People who achieve total physical activity levels several times higher than the current recommended minimum level have a significant reduction in the risk of the five diseases studied.More studies with detailed quantification of total physical activity will help to find more precise relative risk estimates for different levels of activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2301 5th Avenue, Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 1 Flow chart of selecting studies for inclusion in dose-response meta-analysis of effect of physical activity on five diseases
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f1: Fig 1 Flow chart of selecting studies for inclusion in dose-response meta-analysis of effect of physical activity on five diseases

Mentions: Our literature search identified a total of 11 166 citations (fig 1). After removal of the duplicate citations, 6965 studies remained for title and abstract screening, of which 223 articles were potentially relevant for full text review. We excluded 26 articles that used the same dataset as other included studies. An additional 23 articles with insufficient data (such as lack of information on the number of individuals or person years in each activity category, which was needed to convert from qualitative activity levels to METs) were also excluded. This left a total of 174 studies (149 184 285 total person years of follow-up) to include in our bayesian dose-response meta-analysis: 35 studies for breast cancer (50 949 108 person years), 19 for colon cancer (53 929 648 person years), 55 for diabetes (14 051 132 person years), 43 for ischemic heart disease (16 583 824 person years), and 26 for ischemic stroke (13 670 573 person years) (the number of included studies for each outcome does not sum up to 174 because some studies included multiple outcomes). Characteristics of included studies for each outcome are shown in the tables A-E in appendix 4.


Physical activity and risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke events: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

Kyu HH, Bachman VF, Alexander LT, Mumford JE, Afshin A, Estep K, Veerman JL, Delwiche K, Iannarone ML, Moyer ML, Cercy K, Vos T, Murray CJ, Forouzanfar MH - BMJ (2016)

Fig 1 Flow chart of selecting studies for inclusion in dose-response meta-analysis of effect of physical activity on five diseases
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979358&req=5

f1: Fig 1 Flow chart of selecting studies for inclusion in dose-response meta-analysis of effect of physical activity on five diseases
Mentions: Our literature search identified a total of 11 166 citations (fig 1). After removal of the duplicate citations, 6965 studies remained for title and abstract screening, of which 223 articles were potentially relevant for full text review. We excluded 26 articles that used the same dataset as other included studies. An additional 23 articles with insufficient data (such as lack of information on the number of individuals or person years in each activity category, which was needed to convert from qualitative activity levels to METs) were also excluded. This left a total of 174 studies (149 184 285 total person years of follow-up) to include in our bayesian dose-response meta-analysis: 35 studies for breast cancer (50 949 108 person years), 19 for colon cancer (53 929 648 person years), 55 for diabetes (14 051 132 person years), 43 for ischemic heart disease (16 583 824 person years), and 26 for ischemic stroke (13 670 573 person years) (the number of included studies for each outcome does not sum up to 174 because some studies included multiple outcomes). Characteristics of included studies for each outcome are shown in the tables A-E in appendix 4.

Bottom Line: An increase from 600 to 3600 MET minutes/week reduced the risk by an additional 19%.Compared with insufficiently active individuals (total activity <600 MET minutes/week), the risk reduction for those in the highly active category (≥8000 MET minutes/week) was 14% (relative risk 0.863, 95% uncertainty interval 0.829 to 0.900) for breast cancer; 21% (0.789, 0.735 to 0.850) for colon cancer; 28% (0.722, 0.678 to 0.768) for diabetes; 25% (0.754, 0.704 to 0.809) for ischemic heart disease; and 26% (0.736, 0.659 to 0.811) for ischemic stroke.  People who achieve total physical activity levels several times higher than the current recommended minimum level have a significant reduction in the risk of the five diseases studied.More studies with detailed quantification of total physical activity will help to find more precise relative risk estimates for different levels of activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2301 5th Avenue, Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus