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Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation.

Methods:: A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

Results:: Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses.

Conclusions:: Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Peri-coronal bone removal using a piezo-surgical handpiece with an intact follicle surrounding the crown of tooth 14
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Figure 2: Peri-coronal bone removal using a piezo-surgical handpiece with an intact follicle surrounding the crown of tooth 14

Mentions: The principles of harvesting of the autotransplanted donor tooth began with the removal of the overlying deciduous tooth to allow access to the donor tooth. The alveolar bone surrounding the intact dental follicle of the autotransplanted donor tooth was removed using a piezosurgical device with copious irrigation. Bone removal was complete once sufficient alveolar bone had been removed from the pericoronal region of each unerupted autotransplant donor tooth [Figure 1] to allow atraumatic delivery of the tooth with its intact dental follicle [Figure 2] and intact apical papilla tissues [Figure 3]. The donor teeth were mobilized, delivered, and then left in their native alveolar sockets until the moment that their recipient sites were ready to receive them. The autotransplanted teeth were handled only at their coronal aspects by exclusively lightly handling the tooth with forceps occlusal to the cementoenamel junction. The peri-radicular tissues were preferably not handled with forceps, and the tissues of the developing apical papilla were always left untouched. This was especially important to avoid damage to the periodontium of the donor teeth which was considered to be an essential requirement for postoperative wound healing of the donor tooth at the recipient site.


Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery
Peri-coronal bone removal using a piezo-surgical handpiece with an intact follicle surrounding the crown of tooth 14
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979348&req=5

Figure 2: Peri-coronal bone removal using a piezo-surgical handpiece with an intact follicle surrounding the crown of tooth 14
Mentions: The principles of harvesting of the autotransplanted donor tooth began with the removal of the overlying deciduous tooth to allow access to the donor tooth. The alveolar bone surrounding the intact dental follicle of the autotransplanted donor tooth was removed using a piezosurgical device with copious irrigation. Bone removal was complete once sufficient alveolar bone had been removed from the pericoronal region of each unerupted autotransplant donor tooth [Figure 1] to allow atraumatic delivery of the tooth with its intact dental follicle [Figure 2] and intact apical papilla tissues [Figure 3]. The donor teeth were mobilized, delivered, and then left in their native alveolar sockets until the moment that their recipient sites were ready to receive them. The autotransplanted teeth were handled only at their coronal aspects by exclusively lightly handling the tooth with forceps occlusal to the cementoenamel junction. The peri-radicular tissues were preferably not handled with forceps, and the tissues of the developing apical papilla were always left untouched. This was especially important to avoid damage to the periodontium of the donor teeth which was considered to be an essential requirement for postoperative wound healing of the donor tooth at the recipient site.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background:: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation.

Methods:: A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

Results:: Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses.

Conclusions:: Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

No MeSH data available.