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Lateral canthal repositioning in syndromic, antimongoloid slant

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction:: To report a single center's experience in correcting antimongoloid slant in Asian eyes using a minimally invasive approach.

Methods:: Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing correction for antimongoloid slant at author's center, from 2007 to 2013 formed the study group. Concomitant surgical procedures were recorded. Pre- and post-operative photographs at the longest follow-up visit were analyzed and graded for functional and cosmetic outcomes.

Results:: A total of 38 patients (76 eyelids) underwent successful correction to correct eyelid malposition. All patients’ eyelids underwent exclusive lateral canthoplasty through a small incision in the upper eyelid crease and re-suspension technique, and 6 of them underwent bilateral slant correction simultaneously with additional cosmetic or corrective surgeries including hemifacial microsomia and Crouzon's syndrome. Of the 38 patients, 25 were females and 13 were males. The age of the population ranged from 7 to 48 years with a mean age of 27 years. Few instances of transient postoperative chemosis lasting up to 2 weeks and minor infections were reported. All cases showed improvement in eyelid position (as assessed clinically and on photographs), 2 pediatric cases required reoperation in the following 2 years for the recurrent lower eyelid malposition and/or lateral canthal deformity owing to deviated basal bone growth.

Discussion:: Lateral canthoplasty with resuspension technique can effectively address antimongoloid slant for an esthetically desirable lateral canthus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Algorithm for the management of lower eyelid malposition
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Figure 5: Algorithm for the management of lower eyelid malposition

Mentions: Lateral canthoplasty initially evolved as core ophthalmic procedure to rectify eyelid function along with correction of lower eyelid malposition [Figure 5]. As of now, it has evolved a major cosmetic correction for aging and sagging eyes.[46] In other asyndromic situations, (NOT in the present cohort) owing to the biochemical changes associated with age in the tendons of the eye, especially the lateral canthal tendon, there appears a drop of lateral canthus and possible inferior migration of the lower eyelid.[46] In congenital syndromic or defective cases as in this cohort, the abnormal formation of the orbital rim or the uncoordinated, peri-orbital musculature development may contribute to the development of abnormal slants. Additional minor variation in positioning, altered development, structural variation could contribute to the abnormal outer canthal positioning. Trauma to the midfacial structures could also contribute to the alteration in the normal slant owing to the improper rehabilitation of anatomical or functional integrity.


Lateral canthal repositioning in syndromic, antimongoloid slant
Algorithm for the management of lower eyelid malposition
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979343&req=5

Figure 5: Algorithm for the management of lower eyelid malposition
Mentions: Lateral canthoplasty initially evolved as core ophthalmic procedure to rectify eyelid function along with correction of lower eyelid malposition [Figure 5]. As of now, it has evolved a major cosmetic correction for aging and sagging eyes.[46] In other asyndromic situations, (NOT in the present cohort) owing to the biochemical changes associated with age in the tendons of the eye, especially the lateral canthal tendon, there appears a drop of lateral canthus and possible inferior migration of the lower eyelid.[46] In congenital syndromic or defective cases as in this cohort, the abnormal formation of the orbital rim or the uncoordinated, peri-orbital musculature development may contribute to the development of abnormal slants. Additional minor variation in positioning, altered development, structural variation could contribute to the abnormal outer canthal positioning. Trauma to the midfacial structures could also contribute to the alteration in the normal slant owing to the improper rehabilitation of anatomical or functional integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction:: To report a single center's experience in correcting antimongoloid slant in Asian eyes using a minimally invasive approach.

Methods:: Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing correction for antimongoloid slant at author's center, from 2007 to 2013 formed the study group. Concomitant surgical procedures were recorded. Pre- and post-operative photographs at the longest follow-up visit were analyzed and graded for functional and cosmetic outcomes.

Results:: A total of 38 patients (76 eyelids) underwent successful correction to correct eyelid malposition. All patients’ eyelids underwent exclusive lateral canthoplasty through a small incision in the upper eyelid crease and re-suspension technique, and 6 of them underwent bilateral slant correction simultaneously with additional cosmetic or corrective surgeries including hemifacial microsomia and Crouzon's syndrome. Of the 38 patients, 25 were females and 13 were males. The age of the population ranged from 7 to 48 years with a mean age of 27 years. Few instances of transient postoperative chemosis lasting up to 2 weeks and minor infections were reported. All cases showed improvement in eyelid position (as assessed clinically and on photographs), 2 pediatric cases required reoperation in the following 2 years for the recurrent lower eyelid malposition and/or lateral canthal deformity owing to deviated basal bone growth.

Discussion:: Lateral canthoplasty with resuspension technique can effectively address antimongoloid slant for an esthetically desirable lateral canthus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus