Limits...
The use of superficial cervical plexus block in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim:: (1) To assess the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of superficial cervical plexus (SCP) block in oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases. (2) To assess any associated complication specifically related to the procedure.

Subjects and methods:: The total number of patients was 10, out of which 6 were male and 4 were female patients. Six patients had incision and drainage of perimandibular space infections, two patients had Level Ib cervical lymph node biopsies, one patient had enucleation of cyst in the body of mandible, one patient had open reduction and internal fixation isolated angle fracture. Informed written consent was obtained from the patients after they had the procedure explained to them. Exclusion criteria included patient's refusal to undergo the procedure under regional anesthesia, allergy to local anesthetic, excessively anxious, and apprehensive patients, significant upper airway compromise warranting an endotracheal intubation to secure airway. All patients had the procedure done by the same operating surgeon. All patients had their surgical procedures under regional anesthesia (SCP block with supplemental nerve blocks) performed by the same surgeon with satisfactory anesthesia and analgesia without any complication.

Results:: SCP block with concomitant mandibular nerve and long buccal nerve block has a high success rate, low complication rate, and high patient acceptability as shown in the study.

Conclusion:: The notable anesthetic effect and adequate working time, summed with the low risk of accidents and complications, make this technique a good alternative for sensitive blockage of part of the cranial and cervical regions and have positive outcomes in selective OMFS cases.

No MeSH data available.


Superficial cervical plexus block relevant anatomy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979341&req=5

Figure 1: Superficial cervical plexus block relevant anatomy

Mentions: The branches of SCP emerge as four distinct nerves from the posterior border of sternocleidomastoid and supply innervations to superficial structures of the head, neck, and shoulders [Figure 1]. The deep branches of cervical plexus innervate the deep structures of neck including the muscles of anterior neck and diaphragm (phrenic nerve). The third and fourth cervical nerves typically send a branch to the spinal accessory nerve or directly into the deep surface of the trapezius to supply sensory fibers to the muscles.


The use of superficial cervical plexus block in oral and maxillofacial surgical practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases
Superficial cervical plexus block relevant anatomy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4979341&req=5

Figure 1: Superficial cervical plexus block relevant anatomy
Mentions: The branches of SCP emerge as four distinct nerves from the posterior border of sternocleidomastoid and supply innervations to superficial structures of the head, neck, and shoulders [Figure 1]. The deep branches of cervical plexus innervate the deep structures of neck including the muscles of anterior neck and diaphragm (phrenic nerve). The third and fourth cervical nerves typically send a branch to the spinal accessory nerve or directly into the deep surface of the trapezius to supply sensory fibers to the muscles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim:: (1) To assess the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of superficial cervical plexus (SCP) block in oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) practice as an alternative to general anesthesia in selective cases. (2) To assess any associated complication specifically related to the procedure.

Subjects and methods:: The total number of patients was 10, out of which 6 were male and 4 were female patients. Six patients had incision and drainage of perimandibular space infections, two patients had Level Ib cervical lymph node biopsies, one patient had enucleation of cyst in the body of mandible, one patient had open reduction and internal fixation isolated angle fracture. Informed written consent was obtained from the patients after they had the procedure explained to them. Exclusion criteria included patient's refusal to undergo the procedure under regional anesthesia, allergy to local anesthetic, excessively anxious, and apprehensive patients, significant upper airway compromise warranting an endotracheal intubation to secure airway. All patients had the procedure done by the same operating surgeon. All patients had their surgical procedures under regional anesthesia (SCP block with supplemental nerve blocks) performed by the same surgeon with satisfactory anesthesia and analgesia without any complication.

Results:: SCP block with concomitant mandibular nerve and long buccal nerve block has a high success rate, low complication rate, and high patient acceptability as shown in the study.

Conclusion:: The notable anesthetic effect and adequate working time, summed with the low risk of accidents and complications, make this technique a good alternative for sensitive blockage of part of the cranial and cervical regions and have positive outcomes in selective OMFS cases.

No MeSH data available.