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Assessment of chronic inhalation non-cancer toxicity for diethylamine.

Grant RL, Taiwo SO, McCant D - Inhal Toxicol (2015)

Bottom Line: Dose-response data were suitable to benchmark concentration (BMC) modeling.The human equivalent point of departure (PODHEC) was calculated from the 95% lower limit of the BMC(10) using default duration and animal-to-human dosimetric adjustments.The chronic ReV for DEA is 11 ppb (33 µg/m(3)).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Toxicology Division, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality , Austin , TX , USA and.

ABSTRACT
A non-cancer inhalation chronic toxicity assessment for diethylamine (DEA, CAS number 109-89-7) was conducted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. A chronic Reference Value (ReV) was determined based on a high-quality study conducted in mice and rats by the National Toxicology Program. Chronic inhalation ReVs are health-based exposure concentrations used in assessing health risks of long-term (i.e. lifetime) chemical exposure. DEA is used industrially as an organic intermediate to produce corrosion inhibitors, and is widely used in rubber, pharmaceuticals, resins, pesticides, insect repellants, dye processing and as a polymerization inhibitor. Although systemic effects have been noted at higher concentrations, DEA acts primarily as a respiratory irritant with effects occurring in the upper respiratory tract. Rats were exposed to 0, 31, 62.5 and 125 ppm DEA and mice to 0, 16, 31 and 62.5 ppm DEA for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 105 weeks. Mice were slightly more sensitive than rats. The critical effect identified in mice was hyperostosis in the turbinates although DEA caused a number of other non-neoplatic lesions. Dose-response data were suitable to benchmark concentration (BMC) modeling. The human equivalent point of departure (PODHEC) was calculated from the 95% lower limit of the BMC(10) using default duration and animal-to-human dosimetric adjustments. Total uncertainty factors of 90 were applied to the PODHEC to account for variation in sensitivity within the human population, toxicodynamic differences between mice and humans, and database uncertainty. The chronic ReV for DEA is 11 ppb (33 µg/m(3)).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of DEA. When amines with a high pKa come in contact with tissues or fluids at physiologic pH, they become protonated and hydroxide ion is released, causing local necrosis.
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Figure 0001: Chemical structure of DEA. When amines with a high pKa come in contact with tissues or fluids at physiologic pH, they become protonated and hydroxide ion is released, causing local necrosis.

Mentions: Diethylamine is a colorless liquid at room temperature with a fishy, ammonia-like odor [ACGIH, 2001; National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 2011]. Since the vapor pressure is 192 mm Hg at 20 °C (NIOSH, 2011), DEA is present in ambient air as a vapor. It has a molecular weight of 73.1 g mol−1 and is flammable. DEA is miscible with water. As reported in HSDB (2015), DEA is soluble in alcohol, ether, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, paraffin hydrocarbons, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, fixed oils, mineral oils, and oleic and stearic acids. It has a low octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) of 0.58 (HSDB, 2015), which indicates it is unlikely to bioconcentrate. Other physical/chemical properties of DEA may be found in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the chemical structure of DEA, a secondary amine.Figure 1.


Assessment of chronic inhalation non-cancer toxicity for diethylamine.

Grant RL, Taiwo SO, McCant D - Inhal Toxicol (2015)

Chemical structure of DEA. When amines with a high pKa come in contact with tissues or fluids at physiologic pH, they become protonated and hydroxide ion is released, causing local necrosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940886&req=5

Figure 0001: Chemical structure of DEA. When amines with a high pKa come in contact with tissues or fluids at physiologic pH, they become protonated and hydroxide ion is released, causing local necrosis.
Mentions: Diethylamine is a colorless liquid at room temperature with a fishy, ammonia-like odor [ACGIH, 2001; National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 2011]. Since the vapor pressure is 192 mm Hg at 20 °C (NIOSH, 2011), DEA is present in ambient air as a vapor. It has a molecular weight of 73.1 g mol−1 and is flammable. DEA is miscible with water. As reported in HSDB (2015), DEA is soluble in alcohol, ether, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, paraffin hydrocarbons, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, fixed oils, mineral oils, and oleic and stearic acids. It has a low octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) of 0.58 (HSDB, 2015), which indicates it is unlikely to bioconcentrate. Other physical/chemical properties of DEA may be found in Table 1. Figure 1 shows the chemical structure of DEA, a secondary amine.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Dose-response data were suitable to benchmark concentration (BMC) modeling.The human equivalent point of departure (PODHEC) was calculated from the 95% lower limit of the BMC(10) using default duration and animal-to-human dosimetric adjustments.The chronic ReV for DEA is 11 ppb (33 µg/m(3)).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Toxicology Division, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality , Austin , TX , USA and.

ABSTRACT
A non-cancer inhalation chronic toxicity assessment for diethylamine (DEA, CAS number 109-89-7) was conducted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. A chronic Reference Value (ReV) was determined based on a high-quality study conducted in mice and rats by the National Toxicology Program. Chronic inhalation ReVs are health-based exposure concentrations used in assessing health risks of long-term (i.e. lifetime) chemical exposure. DEA is used industrially as an organic intermediate to produce corrosion inhibitors, and is widely used in rubber, pharmaceuticals, resins, pesticides, insect repellants, dye processing and as a polymerization inhibitor. Although systemic effects have been noted at higher concentrations, DEA acts primarily as a respiratory irritant with effects occurring in the upper respiratory tract. Rats were exposed to 0, 31, 62.5 and 125 ppm DEA and mice to 0, 16, 31 and 62.5 ppm DEA for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 105 weeks. Mice were slightly more sensitive than rats. The critical effect identified in mice was hyperostosis in the turbinates although DEA caused a number of other non-neoplatic lesions. Dose-response data were suitable to benchmark concentration (BMC) modeling. The human equivalent point of departure (PODHEC) was calculated from the 95% lower limit of the BMC(10) using default duration and animal-to-human dosimetric adjustments. Total uncertainty factors of 90 were applied to the PODHEC to account for variation in sensitivity within the human population, toxicodynamic differences between mice and humans, and database uncertainty. The chronic ReV for DEA is 11 ppb (33 µg/m(3)).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus