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Mass screening for chronic kidney disease in rural and remote Canadian first nations people: methodology and demographic characteristics.

Lavallee B, Chartrand C, McLeod L, Rigatto C, Tangri N, Dart A, Gordon A, Ophey S, Komenda P - Can J Kidney Health Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: As of August 31, 2014, 1480 people in 11 communities over 2 Tribal Councils have been successfully screened.Further analysis of this cohort will describe theepidemiology of CKD in these communities, and test the cost effectiveness of this strategy.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Integration Project, Winnipeg, Canada ; University of Manitoba, Centre for Aboriginal Health Education, Winnipeg, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Screening the general population for Chronic Kidney Disease is not currently recommended.. Rural and remote Canadian First Nations people suffer a disproportionate burden of Kidney Failure. The Fi rst N at i ons Community Based S creening to Improve Kidney He alth and Prevent D ialysis ( FINISHED ) project intends to test the hypothesis that a mobile, mass screening initiative available to all First Nations people 10 years of age and older residing in rural and/or remote communities, is feasible, will improve health outcomes and is cost effective.

Objectives: The objective of this manuscript is to describe the key elements required to design, implement and evaluate such a program and describe key characteristics of our screened cohort.

Design: Methods and cohort description.

Setting: 11 First Nations communities within 2 Tribal Councils in Manitoba, Canada.

Patients: All First Nations individuals between the ages of 10-80 living in the 11communities were eligible for the screening initiative.

Measurements: Screening Rates achieved within communities.

Methods: An interdisciplinary team partnership was established between the Diabetes Integration Project and the Manitoba Renal Program. Stakeholder consultation was obtained and protocols developed to mass screen community members using point of care testing equipment. All people screened were risk stratified, counselled and referred to nephrologists as required in real time, based on risk.

Results: As of August 31, 2014, 1480 people in 11 communities over 2 Tribal Councils have been successfully screened. A mean screening rate of 21% of all community members eligible (aged 10-80) has been achieved. All patients at intermediate or high risk of kidney failure have been seen by nephrologists within 1 month of screening.

Limitations: Long term outcomes of kidney failure rates not assessed for at least 5 years. Alternative public health initiatives to reduce kidney failure not investigated.

Conclusions: Point of care mass screening, real time risk prediction and counselling of First Nations people at high risk of Kidney Failure is feasible in rural and remote communities. Further analysis of this cohort will describe theepidemiology of CKD in these communities, and test the cost effectiveness of this strategy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pediatric screening paradigm.
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Fig3: Pediatric screening paradigm.

Mentions: As the KFRE has not been validated in children, pediatric (<18 yo) patients followed a separate algorithm designed in collaboration with pediatric nephrologist and endocrinologist partners based on best practice and review of current guidelines and literature. These referral pathways were based on clinical parameters including eGFR (calculated by the Schwartz formula [28] proteinuria), and blood pressure percentiles [29] (Figure 3). Children with a HgbA1C > 6.5% were also referred to the Diabetes Education Resource for Children and Adolescents (DER-CA) in Winnipeg.Figure 3


Mass screening for chronic kidney disease in rural and remote Canadian first nations people: methodology and demographic characteristics.

Lavallee B, Chartrand C, McLeod L, Rigatto C, Tangri N, Dart A, Gordon A, Ophey S, Komenda P - Can J Kidney Health Dis (2015)

Pediatric screening paradigm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940863&req=5

Fig3: Pediatric screening paradigm.
Mentions: As the KFRE has not been validated in children, pediatric (<18 yo) patients followed a separate algorithm designed in collaboration with pediatric nephrologist and endocrinologist partners based on best practice and review of current guidelines and literature. These referral pathways were based on clinical parameters including eGFR (calculated by the Schwartz formula [28] proteinuria), and blood pressure percentiles [29] (Figure 3). Children with a HgbA1C > 6.5% were also referred to the Diabetes Education Resource for Children and Adolescents (DER-CA) in Winnipeg.Figure 3

Bottom Line: As of August 31, 2014, 1480 people in 11 communities over 2 Tribal Councils have been successfully screened.Further analysis of this cohort will describe theepidemiology of CKD in these communities, and test the cost effectiveness of this strategy.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Integration Project, Winnipeg, Canada ; University of Manitoba, Centre for Aboriginal Health Education, Winnipeg, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: Screening the general population for Chronic Kidney Disease is not currently recommended.. Rural and remote Canadian First Nations people suffer a disproportionate burden of Kidney Failure. The Fi rst N at i ons Community Based S creening to Improve Kidney He alth and Prevent D ialysis ( FINISHED ) project intends to test the hypothesis that a mobile, mass screening initiative available to all First Nations people 10 years of age and older residing in rural and/or remote communities, is feasible, will improve health outcomes and is cost effective.

Objectives: The objective of this manuscript is to describe the key elements required to design, implement and evaluate such a program and describe key characteristics of our screened cohort.

Design: Methods and cohort description.

Setting: 11 First Nations communities within 2 Tribal Councils in Manitoba, Canada.

Patients: All First Nations individuals between the ages of 10-80 living in the 11communities were eligible for the screening initiative.

Measurements: Screening Rates achieved within communities.

Methods: An interdisciplinary team partnership was established between the Diabetes Integration Project and the Manitoba Renal Program. Stakeholder consultation was obtained and protocols developed to mass screen community members using point of care testing equipment. All people screened were risk stratified, counselled and referred to nephrologists as required in real time, based on risk.

Results: As of August 31, 2014, 1480 people in 11 communities over 2 Tribal Councils have been successfully screened. A mean screening rate of 21% of all community members eligible (aged 10-80) has been achieved. All patients at intermediate or high risk of kidney failure have been seen by nephrologists within 1 month of screening.

Limitations: Long term outcomes of kidney failure rates not assessed for at least 5 years. Alternative public health initiatives to reduce kidney failure not investigated.

Conclusions: Point of care mass screening, real time risk prediction and counselling of First Nations people at high risk of Kidney Failure is feasible in rural and remote communities. Further analysis of this cohort will describe theepidemiology of CKD in these communities, and test the cost effectiveness of this strategy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus