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Dahonggou Creek virus, a divergent lineage of hantavirus harbored by the long-tailed mole (Scaptonyx fusicaudus).

Kang HJ, Gu SH, Cook JA, Yanagihara R - Trop Med Health (2016)

Bottom Line: Novel hantaviruses, recently detected in moles (order Eulipotyphla, family Talpidae) from Europe, Asia, and North America would predict a broader host range and wider ecological diversity.Following multiple attempts, a previously unrecognized hantavirus, designated Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV), was detected in a long-tailed mole, captured in Shimian County, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China, in August 1989.Also, by further mining natural history collections of archival specimens, the genetic diversity of hantaviruses will elucidate their evolutionary origins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, Departments of Pediatrics and Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Pharmacology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI USA.

ABSTRACT
Novel hantaviruses, recently detected in moles (order Eulipotyphla, family Talpidae) from Europe, Asia, and North America would predict a broader host range and wider ecological diversity. Employing RT-PCR, archival frozen tissues from the Chinese shrew mole (Uropsilus soricipes), broad-footed mole (Scapanus latimanus), coast mole (Scapanus orarius), Townsend's mole (Scapanus townsendii), and long-tailed mole (Scaptonyx fusicaudus) were analyzed for hantavirus RNA. Following multiple attempts, a previously unrecognized hantavirus, designated Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV), was detected in a long-tailed mole, captured in Shimian County, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China, in August 1989. Analyses of a 1058-nucleotide region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-encoding L segment indicated that DHCV was genetically distinct from other rodent-, shrew-, mole-, and bat-borne hantaviruses. Phylogenetic trees, using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, showed that DHCV represented a divergent lineage comprising crocidurine and myosoricine shrew-borne hantaviruses. Although efforts to obtain the S- and M-genomic segments failed, the L-segment sequence analysis, reported here, expands the genetic database of non-rodent-borne hantaviruses. Also, by further mining natural history collections of archival specimens, the genetic diversity of hantaviruses will elucidate their evolutionary origins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree was generated by the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, based on the alignment of the L-segment sequences of Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV) strain MSB281632 (labeled in red) and other hantaviruses. Since tree topologies were very similar using RAxML and MrBayes, the tree generated by MrBayes was displayed. The phylogenetic position of DHCV (HQ616595) (labeled in red) is shown in relationship to other mole-borne hantaviruses (labeled in blue), including Asama virus (ASAV N10, EU929078), Oxbow virus (OXBV Ng1453, FJ593497), Nova virus (NVAV MSB95703, FJ593498), and Rockport virus (RKPV MSB57412, HM015221). Also shown are the phylogenetic positions of bat-borne hantaviruses, including Mouyassué virus (MOYV KB576, JQ287716), Xuan Son virus (XSV VN1982B4, JX912953), Huangpi virus (HUPV Pa-1, JX465369), Magboi virus (MGBV 1209, JN037851), Longquan virus (LQUV Ra-10, JX465379); shrew-borne hantaviruses, including Thottapalayam virus (TPMV VRC66412, EU001330), Imjin virus (MJNV Cl 05-11, EF641806), Uluguru virus (ULUV FMNH158302, JX193697), Kilimanjaro virus (KMJV FMNH174124, JX193700), Seewis virus (SWSV mp70, EF636026), Cao Bang virus (CBNV CBN-3, EF543525), Jemez Springs virus (JMSV MSB144475, FJ593501), Kenkeme virus (KKMV MSB148794, GQ306150), Amga virus (MGAV MSB148558, KM201413), Ash River virus (ARRV MSB73418, EF619961), Asikkala virus (ASIV Drahany, KC880348), Qian Hu Shan virus (QHSV YN05-284, GU566021), Tanganya virus (TGNV Tan826, EF050454), Azagny virus (AZGV KBM15, JF276228), Jeju virus (JJUV 10-11, HQ834697); and rodent-borne hantaviruses, including Hantaan virus (HTNV 76-118, NC_005222), Soochong virus (SOOV SOO-1, DQ056292), Dobrava virus (DOBV Greece, NC_005235), Seoul virus (SEOV 80-39, NC_005238), Tula virus (TULV M5302v, NC_005226), Puumala virus (PUUV Sotkamo, NC_005225), Prospect Hill virus (PHV PH-1, EF646763), Sin Nombre virus (SNV NMH10, NC_005217), and Andes virus (ANDV Chile9717869, AF291704). The numbers at each node are posterior node probabilities based on 150,000 trees. The scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site
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Fig2: Phylogenetic tree was generated by the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, based on the alignment of the L-segment sequences of Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV) strain MSB281632 (labeled in red) and other hantaviruses. Since tree topologies were very similar using RAxML and MrBayes, the tree generated by MrBayes was displayed. The phylogenetic position of DHCV (HQ616595) (labeled in red) is shown in relationship to other mole-borne hantaviruses (labeled in blue), including Asama virus (ASAV N10, EU929078), Oxbow virus (OXBV Ng1453, FJ593497), Nova virus (NVAV MSB95703, FJ593498), and Rockport virus (RKPV MSB57412, HM015221). Also shown are the phylogenetic positions of bat-borne hantaviruses, including Mouyassué virus (MOYV KB576, JQ287716), Xuan Son virus (XSV VN1982B4, JX912953), Huangpi virus (HUPV Pa-1, JX465369), Magboi virus (MGBV 1209, JN037851), Longquan virus (LQUV Ra-10, JX465379); shrew-borne hantaviruses, including Thottapalayam virus (TPMV VRC66412, EU001330), Imjin virus (MJNV Cl 05-11, EF641806), Uluguru virus (ULUV FMNH158302, JX193697), Kilimanjaro virus (KMJV FMNH174124, JX193700), Seewis virus (SWSV mp70, EF636026), Cao Bang virus (CBNV CBN-3, EF543525), Jemez Springs virus (JMSV MSB144475, FJ593501), Kenkeme virus (KKMV MSB148794, GQ306150), Amga virus (MGAV MSB148558, KM201413), Ash River virus (ARRV MSB73418, EF619961), Asikkala virus (ASIV Drahany, KC880348), Qian Hu Shan virus (QHSV YN05-284, GU566021), Tanganya virus (TGNV Tan826, EF050454), Azagny virus (AZGV KBM15, JF276228), Jeju virus (JJUV 10-11, HQ834697); and rodent-borne hantaviruses, including Hantaan virus (HTNV 76-118, NC_005222), Soochong virus (SOOV SOO-1, DQ056292), Dobrava virus (DOBV Greece, NC_005235), Seoul virus (SEOV 80-39, NC_005238), Tula virus (TULV M5302v, NC_005226), Puumala virus (PUUV Sotkamo, NC_005225), Prospect Hill virus (PHV PH-1, EF646763), Sin Nombre virus (SNV NMH10, NC_005217), and Andes virus (ANDV Chile9717869, AF291704). The numbers at each node are posterior node probabilities based on 150,000 trees. The scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site

Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses indicated four distinct clades, with DHCV positioned in a divergent lineage comprising TPMV, MJNV, ULUV, and KMJV (Fig. 2). As evidenced by their phylogenetic positions in each of the four hantavirus clades, mole-borne hantaviruses may be somewhat more catholic in their host selection than present-day rodent-borne hantaviruses [2]. Whether or not this signifies that ancestral moles served as the early hosts of primordial hantaviruses requires further investigation.Fig. 2


Dahonggou Creek virus, a divergent lineage of hantavirus harbored by the long-tailed mole (Scaptonyx fusicaudus).

Kang HJ, Gu SH, Cook JA, Yanagihara R - Trop Med Health (2016)

Phylogenetic tree was generated by the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, based on the alignment of the L-segment sequences of Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV) strain MSB281632 (labeled in red) and other hantaviruses. Since tree topologies were very similar using RAxML and MrBayes, the tree generated by MrBayes was displayed. The phylogenetic position of DHCV (HQ616595) (labeled in red) is shown in relationship to other mole-borne hantaviruses (labeled in blue), including Asama virus (ASAV N10, EU929078), Oxbow virus (OXBV Ng1453, FJ593497), Nova virus (NVAV MSB95703, FJ593498), and Rockport virus (RKPV MSB57412, HM015221). Also shown are the phylogenetic positions of bat-borne hantaviruses, including Mouyassué virus (MOYV KB576, JQ287716), Xuan Son virus (XSV VN1982B4, JX912953), Huangpi virus (HUPV Pa-1, JX465369), Magboi virus (MGBV 1209, JN037851), Longquan virus (LQUV Ra-10, JX465379); shrew-borne hantaviruses, including Thottapalayam virus (TPMV VRC66412, EU001330), Imjin virus (MJNV Cl 05-11, EF641806), Uluguru virus (ULUV FMNH158302, JX193697), Kilimanjaro virus (KMJV FMNH174124, JX193700), Seewis virus (SWSV mp70, EF636026), Cao Bang virus (CBNV CBN-3, EF543525), Jemez Springs virus (JMSV MSB144475, FJ593501), Kenkeme virus (KKMV MSB148794, GQ306150), Amga virus (MGAV MSB148558, KM201413), Ash River virus (ARRV MSB73418, EF619961), Asikkala virus (ASIV Drahany, KC880348), Qian Hu Shan virus (QHSV YN05-284, GU566021), Tanganya virus (TGNV Tan826, EF050454), Azagny virus (AZGV KBM15, JF276228), Jeju virus (JJUV 10-11, HQ834697); and rodent-borne hantaviruses, including Hantaan virus (HTNV 76-118, NC_005222), Soochong virus (SOOV SOO-1, DQ056292), Dobrava virus (DOBV Greece, NC_005235), Seoul virus (SEOV 80-39, NC_005238), Tula virus (TULV M5302v, NC_005226), Puumala virus (PUUV Sotkamo, NC_005225), Prospect Hill virus (PHV PH-1, EF646763), Sin Nombre virus (SNV NMH10, NC_005217), and Andes virus (ANDV Chile9717869, AF291704). The numbers at each node are posterior node probabilities based on 150,000 trees. The scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940846&req=5

Fig2: Phylogenetic tree was generated by the maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, based on the alignment of the L-segment sequences of Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV) strain MSB281632 (labeled in red) and other hantaviruses. Since tree topologies were very similar using RAxML and MrBayes, the tree generated by MrBayes was displayed. The phylogenetic position of DHCV (HQ616595) (labeled in red) is shown in relationship to other mole-borne hantaviruses (labeled in blue), including Asama virus (ASAV N10, EU929078), Oxbow virus (OXBV Ng1453, FJ593497), Nova virus (NVAV MSB95703, FJ593498), and Rockport virus (RKPV MSB57412, HM015221). Also shown are the phylogenetic positions of bat-borne hantaviruses, including Mouyassué virus (MOYV KB576, JQ287716), Xuan Son virus (XSV VN1982B4, JX912953), Huangpi virus (HUPV Pa-1, JX465369), Magboi virus (MGBV 1209, JN037851), Longquan virus (LQUV Ra-10, JX465379); shrew-borne hantaviruses, including Thottapalayam virus (TPMV VRC66412, EU001330), Imjin virus (MJNV Cl 05-11, EF641806), Uluguru virus (ULUV FMNH158302, JX193697), Kilimanjaro virus (KMJV FMNH174124, JX193700), Seewis virus (SWSV mp70, EF636026), Cao Bang virus (CBNV CBN-3, EF543525), Jemez Springs virus (JMSV MSB144475, FJ593501), Kenkeme virus (KKMV MSB148794, GQ306150), Amga virus (MGAV MSB148558, KM201413), Ash River virus (ARRV MSB73418, EF619961), Asikkala virus (ASIV Drahany, KC880348), Qian Hu Shan virus (QHSV YN05-284, GU566021), Tanganya virus (TGNV Tan826, EF050454), Azagny virus (AZGV KBM15, JF276228), Jeju virus (JJUV 10-11, HQ834697); and rodent-borne hantaviruses, including Hantaan virus (HTNV 76-118, NC_005222), Soochong virus (SOOV SOO-1, DQ056292), Dobrava virus (DOBV Greece, NC_005235), Seoul virus (SEOV 80-39, NC_005238), Tula virus (TULV M5302v, NC_005226), Puumala virus (PUUV Sotkamo, NC_005225), Prospect Hill virus (PHV PH-1, EF646763), Sin Nombre virus (SNV NMH10, NC_005217), and Andes virus (ANDV Chile9717869, AF291704). The numbers at each node are posterior node probabilities based on 150,000 trees. The scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site
Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses indicated four distinct clades, with DHCV positioned in a divergent lineage comprising TPMV, MJNV, ULUV, and KMJV (Fig. 2). As evidenced by their phylogenetic positions in each of the four hantavirus clades, mole-borne hantaviruses may be somewhat more catholic in their host selection than present-day rodent-borne hantaviruses [2]. Whether or not this signifies that ancestral moles served as the early hosts of primordial hantaviruses requires further investigation.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Novel hantaviruses, recently detected in moles (order Eulipotyphla, family Talpidae) from Europe, Asia, and North America would predict a broader host range and wider ecological diversity.Following multiple attempts, a previously unrecognized hantavirus, designated Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV), was detected in a long-tailed mole, captured in Shimian County, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China, in August 1989.Also, by further mining natural history collections of archival specimens, the genetic diversity of hantaviruses will elucidate their evolutionary origins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pacific Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, Departments of Pediatrics and Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Pharmacology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI USA.

ABSTRACT
Novel hantaviruses, recently detected in moles (order Eulipotyphla, family Talpidae) from Europe, Asia, and North America would predict a broader host range and wider ecological diversity. Employing RT-PCR, archival frozen tissues from the Chinese shrew mole (Uropsilus soricipes), broad-footed mole (Scapanus latimanus), coast mole (Scapanus orarius), Townsend's mole (Scapanus townsendii), and long-tailed mole (Scaptonyx fusicaudus) were analyzed for hantavirus RNA. Following multiple attempts, a previously unrecognized hantavirus, designated Dahonggou Creek virus (DHCV), was detected in a long-tailed mole, captured in Shimian County, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China, in August 1989. Analyses of a 1058-nucleotide region of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-encoding L segment indicated that DHCV was genetically distinct from other rodent-, shrew-, mole-, and bat-borne hantaviruses. Phylogenetic trees, using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, showed that DHCV represented a divergent lineage comprising crocidurine and myosoricine shrew-borne hantaviruses. Although efforts to obtain the S- and M-genomic segments failed, the L-segment sequence analysis, reported here, expands the genetic database of non-rodent-borne hantaviruses. Also, by further mining natural history collections of archival specimens, the genetic diversity of hantaviruses will elucidate their evolutionary origins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus