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Rubus occidentalis alleviates hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injection of acidic saline in rats.

Choi GJ, Kang H, Kim WJ, Baek CW, Jung YH, Woo YC, Kwon JW - BMC Complement Altern Med (2016)

Bottom Line: For both experiments, the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was evaluated with von Frey filaments before the first acidic saline injection, 24 h after the second injection, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min, 24 and 48 h after the drug administration.Compared with the control group, the MWT significantly increased up to 45 min after injection of ROE 100 mg/kg and up to 60 min after injection of ROE 300 mg/kg, respectively.Injection of ROE together with yohimbine or mecamylamine significantly decreased the MWT compared with the effect of ROE alone, while ROE together with dexmedetomidine significantly increased the MWT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, 06911, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) fruit extract (ROE) in a rat model of chronic muscle pain and examine the mechanisms involved.

Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and chronic muscle pain was induced by two injections of acidic saline into one gastrocnemius muscle. For the first experiment, 50 rats were randomly assigned to five groups. After the development of hyperalgesia, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0.9 % saline or ROE (10, 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg). For the second experiment, 70 rats were randomly assigned to seven groups. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline, yohimbine, dexmedetomidine, prazosin, atropine, mecamylamine, or naloxone after the development of hyperalgesia. Ten minutes later, ROE (300 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. For both experiments, the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was evaluated with von Frey filaments before the first acidic saline injection, 24 h after the second injection, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min, 24 and 48 h after the drug administration.

Results: Compared with the control group, the MWT significantly increased up to 45 min after injection of ROE 100 mg/kg and up to 60 min after injection of ROE 300 mg/kg, respectively. Injection of ROE together with yohimbine or mecamylamine significantly decreased the MWT compared with the effect of ROE alone, while ROE together with dexmedetomidine significantly increased the MWT.

Conclusions: ROE showed antinociceptive activity against induced chronic muscle pain, which may be mediated by α2-adrenergic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Antinociceptive effect of Rubus occidentalis extract (a. ipsilateral site, b. contralateral site). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with ROE at the indicated doses after the development of hyperalgesia. ROE, Rubus occidentalis extract; BI, before injection; AI, after injection, *p < 0.05 compared with the control group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey test
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Fig1: Antinociceptive effect of Rubus occidentalis extract (a. ipsilateral site, b. contralateral site). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with ROE at the indicated doses after the development of hyperalgesia. ROE, Rubus occidentalis extract; BI, before injection; AI, after injection, *p < 0.05 compared with the control group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey test

Mentions: Throughout the experimental period, all rats remained well-groomed and seemed to maintain normal food and water intake, and their gait appeared unaffected. Two injections of pH 4.0 saline into one gastrocnemius muscle 2 days apart resulted in a bilateral decrease in the MWT (Fig. 1). All rats completed the study and no complications were observed.Fig. 1


Rubus occidentalis alleviates hyperalgesia induced by repeated intramuscular injection of acidic saline in rats.

Choi GJ, Kang H, Kim WJ, Baek CW, Jung YH, Woo YC, Kwon JW - BMC Complement Altern Med (2016)

Antinociceptive effect of Rubus occidentalis extract (a. ipsilateral site, b. contralateral site). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with ROE at the indicated doses after the development of hyperalgesia. ROE, Rubus occidentalis extract; BI, before injection; AI, after injection, *p < 0.05 compared with the control group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey test
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940828&req=5

Fig1: Antinociceptive effect of Rubus occidentalis extract (a. ipsilateral site, b. contralateral site). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with ROE at the indicated doses after the development of hyperalgesia. ROE, Rubus occidentalis extract; BI, before injection; AI, after injection, *p < 0.05 compared with the control group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey test
Mentions: Throughout the experimental period, all rats remained well-groomed and seemed to maintain normal food and water intake, and their gait appeared unaffected. Two injections of pH 4.0 saline into one gastrocnemius muscle 2 days apart resulted in a bilateral decrease in the MWT (Fig. 1). All rats completed the study and no complications were observed.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: For both experiments, the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was evaluated with von Frey filaments before the first acidic saline injection, 24 h after the second injection, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min, 24 and 48 h after the drug administration.Compared with the control group, the MWT significantly increased up to 45 min after injection of ROE 100 mg/kg and up to 60 min after injection of ROE 300 mg/kg, respectively.Injection of ROE together with yohimbine or mecamylamine significantly decreased the MWT compared with the effect of ROE alone, while ROE together with dexmedetomidine significantly increased the MWT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, 06911, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) fruit extract (ROE) in a rat model of chronic muscle pain and examine the mechanisms involved.

Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and chronic muscle pain was induced by two injections of acidic saline into one gastrocnemius muscle. For the first experiment, 50 rats were randomly assigned to five groups. After the development of hyperalgesia, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0.9 % saline or ROE (10, 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg). For the second experiment, 70 rats were randomly assigned to seven groups. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline, yohimbine, dexmedetomidine, prazosin, atropine, mecamylamine, or naloxone after the development of hyperalgesia. Ten minutes later, ROE (300 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. For both experiments, the mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) was evaluated with von Frey filaments before the first acidic saline injection, 24 h after the second injection, and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100, and 120 min, 24 and 48 h after the drug administration.

Results: Compared with the control group, the MWT significantly increased up to 45 min after injection of ROE 100 mg/kg and up to 60 min after injection of ROE 300 mg/kg, respectively. Injection of ROE together with yohimbine or mecamylamine significantly decreased the MWT compared with the effect of ROE alone, while ROE together with dexmedetomidine significantly increased the MWT.

Conclusions: ROE showed antinociceptive activity against induced chronic muscle pain, which may be mediated by α2-adrenergic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus