Limits...
Early-life exposures to infectious agents and later cancer development.

Vedham V, Verma M, Mahabir S - Cancer Med (2015)

Bottom Line: There is a growing evidence that certain infectious agents acquired in early life can give rise to cancer development, but estimates of the cancer burden from this early-life acquisition is unknown.In this article, we have selected five cancers (cervical, liver, Burkitt's lymphoma-leukemia, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma) and examine their links to infectious agents (HPV, HBV, HCV, EBV, and HTLV-1) acquired in early life.For these agents, the acquisition in early life is from mother-to-child transmission, perinatal contact (with genital tract secretions, amniotic fluids, blood, and breast milk), saliva, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Methods and Technologies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, Maryland, 20850.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Basic mechanistic model of the links between early‐life exposures to infectious agents and cancer.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940808&req=5

cam4538-fig-0001: Basic mechanistic model of the links between early‐life exposures to infectious agents and cancer.

Mentions: Three basic mechanisms may explain how early life exposures to infections affect cancer development: (1) epigenetic, (2) immune, and (3) genetic (see Fig. 1).


Early-life exposures to infectious agents and later cancer development.

Vedham V, Verma M, Mahabir S - Cancer Med (2015)

Basic mechanistic model of the links between early‐life exposures to infectious agents and cancer.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940808&req=5

cam4538-fig-0001: Basic mechanistic model of the links between early‐life exposures to infectious agents and cancer.
Mentions: Three basic mechanisms may explain how early life exposures to infections affect cancer development: (1) epigenetic, (2) immune, and (3) genetic (see Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: There is a growing evidence that certain infectious agents acquired in early life can give rise to cancer development, but estimates of the cancer burden from this early-life acquisition is unknown.In this article, we have selected five cancers (cervical, liver, Burkitt's lymphoma-leukemia, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma) and examine their links to infectious agents (HPV, HBV, HCV, EBV, and HTLV-1) acquired in early life.For these agents, the acquisition in early life is from mother-to-child transmission, perinatal contact (with genital tract secretions, amniotic fluids, blood, and breast milk), saliva, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Methods and Technologies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, Maryland, 20850.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus