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Preliminary population-based epidemiological and clinical data on 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) from Lima, Peru.

Tinoco Y, Razuri H, Ortiz EJ, Gomez J, Widdowson MA, Uyeki T, Laguna-Torres VA, Kochel TJ, Gilman RH, Montgomery JM, Peru Influenza Working Gro - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2009)

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To the editor: Since early April 2009, the world has been responding to a pandemic of a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (pH1N1)... Data on transmission and severity of pH1N1, especially from the Southern Hemisphere will help plan for the upcoming Northern Hemisphere influenza season... Of the 191 ILI cases, 134 were positive (70·1%) for pH1N1 – only one seasonal H3N2 isolate was identified from samples negative for pH1N1... The percentage of ILI due to pH1N1 was highest in the age group of 5–17 years (86·2%) compared with other age groups (Table 1)... Weekly incidence rates of pH1N1 ranged from 11·7 to 27·8 cases/1000 person‐weeks... We have begun to observe a reduction of pH1N1 IRs and ARs, as well as a reduction in ILI ARs over time (Table 1)... As with other countries, pH1N1 IRs and ARs were highest in children <18 years old... This may suggest that children are either more susceptible to infection with pH1N1, as compared with adults, or perhaps that their social network and/or behavior contributed to a higher risk of infection... As mentioned previously, individuals <18 years of age in our population had the highest proportion of pH1N1 as an etiologic agent of ILI (86·2%), opposed to what is normally observed in a prepandemic influenza season, whereby in this age group influenza virus is not the most common cause of respiratory illness... These data may suggest a trend in displacement of seasonal influenza by pH1N1 as has been observed in other countries, including those in the Southern Hemisphere, Epidemiologic data on the impact of pandemic influenza from the Southern Hemisphere winter may help inform planning for the upcoming Northern Hemisphere influenza season... Alberto Laguna‐Torres are employees of the US Government... This work was prepared as part of their official duties... Title 17 U.S.C. § 105 provides that ‘Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government’... Title 17 U.S.C. § 101.

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 pH1N1 Epidemiological curve between June 14th and August 1st 2009 in Lima, Peru.
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f1:  pH1N1 Epidemiological curve between June 14th and August 1st 2009 in Lima, Peru.

Mentions: Mitigation strategies, such as educational campaigns and airport screening of incoming foreign passengers, and discouraging mass gatherings, were implemented in mid‐April in Lima. Although these sorts of efforts have been shown to be useful in minimizing dissemination of influenza in other countries, and likely did so in Peru, these initial strategies did not prevent the spread of pH1N1 among the general population of Lima. Conversely, school closures may have helped to reduce the IRs and ARs of pH1N1 and ILI, respectively, among school aged children; however, it is also possible that school closures may have been implemented after most children had been ill, as rates in this population were already beginning to decline (Figure 1 and Table 1, [link]). Additional weeks of surveillance and further studies (i.e., serological surveys) will help to address these questions. Alternatively, our results may reflect the early phase of this pandemic in Peru, with rapid transmission among children and young adults related to school contact and social behavior, with delayed spread among older adults.7


Preliminary population-based epidemiological and clinical data on 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) from Lima, Peru.

Tinoco Y, Razuri H, Ortiz EJ, Gomez J, Widdowson MA, Uyeki T, Laguna-Torres VA, Kochel TJ, Gilman RH, Montgomery JM, Peru Influenza Working Gro - Influenza Other Respir Viruses (2009)

 pH1N1 Epidemiological curve between June 14th and August 1st 2009 in Lima, Peru.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940804&req=5

f1:  pH1N1 Epidemiological curve between June 14th and August 1st 2009 in Lima, Peru.
Mentions: Mitigation strategies, such as educational campaigns and airport screening of incoming foreign passengers, and discouraging mass gatherings, were implemented in mid‐April in Lima. Although these sorts of efforts have been shown to be useful in minimizing dissemination of influenza in other countries, and likely did so in Peru, these initial strategies did not prevent the spread of pH1N1 among the general population of Lima. Conversely, school closures may have helped to reduce the IRs and ARs of pH1N1 and ILI, respectively, among school aged children; however, it is also possible that school closures may have been implemented after most children had been ill, as rates in this population were already beginning to decline (Figure 1 and Table 1, [link]). Additional weeks of surveillance and further studies (i.e., serological surveys) will help to address these questions. Alternatively, our results may reflect the early phase of this pandemic in Peru, with rapid transmission among children and young adults related to school contact and social behavior, with delayed spread among older adults.7

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

To the editor: Since early April 2009, the world has been responding to a pandemic of a novel H1N1 influenza A virus (pH1N1)... Data on transmission and severity of pH1N1, especially from the Southern Hemisphere will help plan for the upcoming Northern Hemisphere influenza season... Of the 191 ILI cases, 134 were positive (70·1%) for pH1N1 – only one seasonal H3N2 isolate was identified from samples negative for pH1N1... The percentage of ILI due to pH1N1 was highest in the age group of 5–17 years (86·2%) compared with other age groups (Table 1)... Weekly incidence rates of pH1N1 ranged from 11·7 to 27·8 cases/1000 person‐weeks... We have begun to observe a reduction of pH1N1 IRs and ARs, as well as a reduction in ILI ARs over time (Table 1)... As with other countries, pH1N1 IRs and ARs were highest in children <18 years old... This may suggest that children are either more susceptible to infection with pH1N1, as compared with adults, or perhaps that their social network and/or behavior contributed to a higher risk of infection... As mentioned previously, individuals <18 years of age in our population had the highest proportion of pH1N1 as an etiologic agent of ILI (86·2%), opposed to what is normally observed in a prepandemic influenza season, whereby in this age group influenza virus is not the most common cause of respiratory illness... These data may suggest a trend in displacement of seasonal influenza by pH1N1 as has been observed in other countries, including those in the Southern Hemisphere, Epidemiologic data on the impact of pandemic influenza from the Southern Hemisphere winter may help inform planning for the upcoming Northern Hemisphere influenza season... Alberto Laguna‐Torres are employees of the US Government... This work was prepared as part of their official duties... Title 17 U.S.C. § 105 provides that ‘Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government’... Title 17 U.S.C. § 101.

Show MeSH