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"Making a difference" - Medical students' opportunities for transformational change in health care and learning through quality improvement projects.

Bergh AM, Bac M, Hugo J, Sandars J - BMC Med Educ (2016)

Bottom Line: Quality improvement is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of the medical curriculum, with the intention of improving the health care system to provide better health care.Student group reports from rotations in learning centres of the University of Pretoria in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa were analysed for the period 2012 to 2015.Three main themes were identified: (1) 'Situated learning', describing students' exposure to the discrepancies between ideal and reality in a real-life situation and how they learned to deal with complex situations, individually and as student group; (2) 'Facing dilemmas', describing how students were challenged about the non-ideal reality; (3) 'Making a difference', describing the impact of the students' projects, with greater understanding of themselves and others through working in teams but also making a change in the health care system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: South African MRC Unit for Maternal and Infant Health Care Strategies, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X323, Pretoria, Arcadia, 0007, South Africa. anne-marie.bergh@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT

Background: Quality improvement is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of the medical curriculum, with the intention of improving the health care system to provide better health care. The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate medical students' experiences of their involvement in quality improvement projects during a district health rotation.

Methods: Student group reports from rotations in learning centres of the University of Pretoria in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa were analysed for the period 2012 to 2015. Interviews were conducted with health care providers at four learning centres in 2013.

Results: Three main themes were identified: (1) 'Situated learning', describing students' exposure to the discrepancies between ideal and reality in a real-life situation and how they learned to deal with complex situations, individually and as student group; (2) 'Facing dilemmas', describing how students were challenged about the non-ideal reality; (3) 'Making a difference', describing the impact of the students' projects, with greater understanding of themselves and others through working in teams but also making a change in the health care system.

Conclusion: Quality improvement projects can provide an opportunity for both the transformation of health care and for transformative learning, with individual and 'collective' self-authorship.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

‘Collective’ self-authorship in context
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Fig1: ‘Collective’ self-authorship in context

Mentions: We argue that during the QI project a ‘collective’ self-authorship occurs because the students have an intense period of engagement with their group but also with the local health care context. Our conceptualisation of ‘collective’ self-authorship is depicted in Fig. 1. The development of individual self-authorship and ‘collective’ self-authorship occur concurrently and ‘collective’ is especially related to the interpersonal component of individual self-authorship. Just as with individual self-authorship, ‘collective’ authorship also consists of three overlapping dimensions – the group developed or matured cognitively as individuals through their group activities, they reflected on their own position as a group and they established relationships with other groups as part of their learning partnerships. ‘Collective’ self-authorship could be summarised by students’ reflections of making a difference. The category of mastering of subject matter is closely linked to the students’ cognitive development. An example of intra-group matters relates to the way in which intra-group conflicts were resolved. The inter-group tensions between dieticians and nurses were prominent at some sites and students had to learn how to deal with situations where they found themselves in the proverbial line of fire.Fig. 1


"Making a difference" - Medical students' opportunities for transformational change in health care and learning through quality improvement projects.

Bergh AM, Bac M, Hugo J, Sandars J - BMC Med Educ (2016)

‘Collective’ self-authorship in context
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940764&req=5

Fig1: ‘Collective’ self-authorship in context
Mentions: We argue that during the QI project a ‘collective’ self-authorship occurs because the students have an intense period of engagement with their group but also with the local health care context. Our conceptualisation of ‘collective’ self-authorship is depicted in Fig. 1. The development of individual self-authorship and ‘collective’ self-authorship occur concurrently and ‘collective’ is especially related to the interpersonal component of individual self-authorship. Just as with individual self-authorship, ‘collective’ authorship also consists of three overlapping dimensions – the group developed or matured cognitively as individuals through their group activities, they reflected on their own position as a group and they established relationships with other groups as part of their learning partnerships. ‘Collective’ self-authorship could be summarised by students’ reflections of making a difference. The category of mastering of subject matter is closely linked to the students’ cognitive development. An example of intra-group matters relates to the way in which intra-group conflicts were resolved. The inter-group tensions between dieticians and nurses were prominent at some sites and students had to learn how to deal with situations where they found themselves in the proverbial line of fire.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Quality improvement is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of the medical curriculum, with the intention of improving the health care system to provide better health care.Student group reports from rotations in learning centres of the University of Pretoria in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa were analysed for the period 2012 to 2015.Three main themes were identified: (1) 'Situated learning', describing students' exposure to the discrepancies between ideal and reality in a real-life situation and how they learned to deal with complex situations, individually and as student group; (2) 'Facing dilemmas', describing how students were challenged about the non-ideal reality; (3) 'Making a difference', describing the impact of the students' projects, with greater understanding of themselves and others through working in teams but also making a change in the health care system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: South African MRC Unit for Maternal and Infant Health Care Strategies, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X323, Pretoria, Arcadia, 0007, South Africa. anne-marie.bergh@up.ac.za.

ABSTRACT

Background: Quality improvement is increasingly becoming an essential aspect of the medical curriculum, with the intention of improving the health care system to provide better health care. The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate medical students' experiences of their involvement in quality improvement projects during a district health rotation.

Methods: Student group reports from rotations in learning centres of the University of Pretoria in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa were analysed for the period 2012 to 2015. Interviews were conducted with health care providers at four learning centres in 2013.

Results: Three main themes were identified: (1) 'Situated learning', describing students' exposure to the discrepancies between ideal and reality in a real-life situation and how they learned to deal with complex situations, individually and as student group; (2) 'Facing dilemmas', describing how students were challenged about the non-ideal reality; (3) 'Making a difference', describing the impact of the students' projects, with greater understanding of themselves and others through working in teams but also making a change in the health care system.

Conclusion: Quality improvement projects can provide an opportunity for both the transformation of health care and for transformative learning, with individual and 'collective' self-authorship.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus